This Day in Aviation History

via John Currin (JC – Ex RNZN) – Google+ Public Posts http://ift.tt/2oM2fZR

Gazing Skyward TV
originally shared:

This Day in Aviation History
April 19th, 1951
First flight of the de Havilland Sea Venom.
 
The de Havilland Sea Venom was a British postwar carrier-capable jet aircraft developed from the de Havilland Venom. It served with the Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm and with the Royal Australian Navy. The French Navy operated the Aquilon, a version of the Sea Venom FAW.20 licence-built by SNCASE (Sud-Est).
 
The Sea Venom was the navalised version of the Venom NF.2 two-seat night fighter, and was used as an all-weather interceptor by the Fleet Air Arm (FAA). The necessary modifications for use on the Royal Navy's aircraft carriers included folding wings, a tailhook (which retracted into a characteristic "lip" over the jetpipe) and strengthened, long-stroke undercarriage. The canopy was modified to allow ejection from underwater. The first prototype made its first flight in 1951, and began carrier trials that same year. A further two prototypes were built. The first production Sea Venom took the designation FAW.20 (Fighter, All-Weather). It was powered by a single de Havilland Ghost 103 turbojet engine and its armament was the same as the RAF version. The next variant was the FAW.21, which included the modifications introduced in the Venom NF.2A and NF.3. Some of these modifications included the Ghost 104 engine, a clear-view canopy and American radar. The final Royal Navy variant was the FAW.22 powered by the Ghost 105 engine. A total of 39 of this type were built in 1957–58. Some were later fitted out with the de Havilland Firestreak air-to-air missile….
 
Source:
Wikipedia, de Havilland Sea Venom: http://gstv.us/1YDEX2J
 
YouTube, Sea Venom Ramjets Aerobatic team: http://gstv.us/2pqJFpQ
 
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Photo from: http://gstv.us/1YDG820
 
#avgeek #deHavilland #Sea #Venom #military #British #aviation #history #fb
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