This Day in Aviation History

via John Currin (JC ‘s Naval and Military) – Google+ Public Posts

Gazing Skyward TV
originally shared:

This Day in Aviation History
July 6th, 1947
First flight of the Dassault MD 315 Flamant.
The Dassault MD 315 Flamant is a French light twin-engined transport airplane built shortly after World War II by Dassault Aviation for the French Air Force.
Design work on a twin-engined light transport started in 1946 with the MD 303, a development of an earlier project for an eight-seat communications aircraft the Marcel Bloch MB-30. The prototype MD 303 first flew on 26 February 1947 powered by two Béarn 6D engines, designed to meet a French Air Force requirement for a colonial communications aircraft. A re-engined version was ordered into production at the new Dassault factory at Bordeaux-Mérignac. The production aircraft was a low-wing monoplane with twin tail surfaces and a tri-cycle undercarriage and powered by two Renault 12S piston engines.
Three main versions of the aircraft now named Flamant (means Flamingo in French) were produced. The MD 315 10-seat colonial communication aircraft (first flown on 6 July 1947), the MD 312 six-seat transport aircraft (first flew on 27 April 1950), and the MD 311 navigation trainer (first flew on 23 March 1948. The MD 311 had a distinctive glazed nose for its role as both a bombing and navigation trainer….
Wikipedia, Dassault MD 315 Flamant:
YouTube, A3A – Vol en Patrouille et Démonstration de Deux Dassault "Flamant" MD 311 & 312:
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#avgeek #Dassault #MD315 #Flamant #France #aviation #history #fb

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