Today in U.S. Naval History: January 14

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Tuesday, January 14, 2014, 10:31 AM
File USS Gudgeon (SS-211), photo: U.S. Navy Department Library
USS Gudgeon (SS-211), photo: U.S. Navy Department Library

Today in U.S. Naval History – January 14

1813 – U.S. Frigate Chesapeake captures British brig Hero

1863 – Navy General Order 4, Emancipation Proclamation

1943 – In first submarine resupply mission, USS Gudgeon lands six men, 2,000 pounds of equipment and supplies on Negros Island.

For more information about naval history, visit the Naval History and Heritage Command website at history.navy.mil.

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Brittany Ferries Orders New Gas Powered Flagship

100+ gCaptain ⚓ Maritime & Offshore News by Mike Schuler  /  8h  //  keep unread  //  hide  //  preview

20777_blogBrittany Ferries announced Tuesday that it placed an order for a LNG-powered cruise-ferry to replace the company’s current flagship, Pont-Aven.

Brittany Ferries and STX France have been working together for two years on a feasibility study for powering a cruise-ferry by LNG. The new ship, costing some 270 million euros ($370 million) will be built by STX France in St. Nazaire and she will enter service in late spring 2017.

At 210 meters, the vessel will be the largest ship in the Brittany fleet and one of the biggest gas-powered vessels in the world.

The new vessel will operate on the Portsmouth-St Malo route, making it the first U.K.-based ferry to run on liquefied natural gas.

Mike Bevens, Group Commercial Director comments: “This represents a huge investment which will benefit not simply our customers but the environment as well. Unlike other forms of transport, such as aircraft or trains, every one of our ships is different, each possessing its own unique character. This addition to our fleet will be no exception, but will incorporate all the best features of our other vessels so as to provide our customers with a truly exceptional experience. No other ferry in the UK will come close to offering this new ship’s range of facilities and its launch will mark the beginning of a new era in ferry travel.”

Technical Information

  • Length 210 meters
  • Width 32 meters
  • Draught 7 meters
  • Gross tonnage: 52,500
  • Maximum speed: 24.5 knots
  • Dual fuel propulsion capability with marine gas oil as back up
  • Number of decks: 12
  • Number of passengers: 2,474
  • Number of crew: 189
  • Number of cabins: 675 including 12 Commodore Suites, 51 Deluxe cabins, 30 pet-friendly cabins,15 wheelchair-accessible cabins
  • Garage capacity: 800 cars or mix, for example, of 325 cars plus 80 freight units

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Box Carriers Tie Up on Asia-Indian Liner Service

gCaptain ⚓ Maritime & Offshore News by gCaptain Staff  /  7h  //  keep unread  //  hide  //  preview
File photo courtesy OOCLFile photo courtesy OOCL

HONG KONG – APL, Maersk Line and OOCL on Tuesday announced a new cooperation on three existing Far East to Indian Subcontinent services beginning in February 2014.

A total of 18 vessels with a combined capacity of about 17,500 TEU will be deployed to the three Far East-Indian Subcontinent services in a Slot Sharing Agreement that also includes partners CMA CGM, Emirates Shipping Line, Hamburg Süd and Regional Container Lines.

The  enhanced services will enable the carriers to offer three weekly sailings – covering China, Korea, India, Pakistan, Malaysia and Singapore – compared to one weekly sailing currently offered independently by each liner.

“Our multi-carrier cooperation will provide more frequent sailings between Asia’s major trading hubs, and at the same time eliminate unnecessary service duplications,” the partner carriers said in a joint statement. “With improved operational efficiency and a more comprehensive service structure, the enhanced Far East-India Express services suite will offer shippers flexible and competitive options best catered to their needs.”

The new port rotations for the three services are as follows:

  • CIX (to be operated by APL, Emirates and OOCL); Nansha  – Chiwan – Hong Kong – Singapore – Colombo – Jawaharlal Nehru – Pipavav –Colombo – Port Klang – Singapore – Nansha
  • CIX3 (to be operated by Hamburg Süd, OOCL and Regional Container Lines); Shanghai – Ningbo – Xiamen – Hong Kong –  Singapore – Colombo – Jawaharlal Nehru – Pipavav – Port Klang – Singapore – Hong Kong – Shanghai
  • FI3 (to be operated by CMA CGM and Maersk); Xingang – Dalian – Qingdao – Kwangyang – Busan – Ningbo – Hong Kong – Singapore – Tanjung Pelepas – Colombo – Pipavav – Jawaharlal Nehru – Port Qasim – Singapore – Xingang

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U.S. Surface Navy Priorities Updated

By Rear Adm. Thomas S. Rowden, Director, Surface Warfare Division, N96

Tuesday, January 14, 2014, 4:17 PM
File Ships from the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group simulate a strait transit in the Atlantic Ocean, Dec. 10, 2013. The strike group was conducting a pre-deployment evaluation. (U.S. Navy Photo by Justin Wolpert)
Ships from the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group simulate a strait transit in the Atlantic Ocean, Dec. 10, 2013. The strike group was conducting a pre-deployment evaluation. (U.S. Navy Photo by Justin Wolpert)

The progress we have made in understanding and funding manpower shortages, establishing and funding defendable maintenance requirements, stabilizing procurement accounts, and the successful deployment of the littoral combat ship USS Freedom to the Western Pacific have led me to reassess the N96 Surface Warfare priorities.

The priorities are now:

  • Support rebalance to Pacific
  • Build to the future
  • Make the things we have today work

As President Obama highlighted in his Defense Strategic Guidance, the center of world mass is moving east towards Asia. This new focus brings into sharp relief the realities of Eastern Pacific geography and threats to our freedom of navigation at the crossroads of the global economy. The economic and strategic necessities of maintaining the freedom of the global commons mandates that the U.S. Navy – indeed all global naval powers – will play a critical role in shaping the future, multi-polar world. The surface Navy is going to be in the center of this role and to succeed we need to refocus on our core warfighting competencies: anti-submarine warfare, anti-surface warfare, and integrated air and missile defense.

My generation cut our teeth squaring off against the Soviets in the Pacific. The threat was real and global. Since the abatement of the Soviet threat, we have as a Navy turned our attention to power projection. No other nation on Earth challenged our ability to control the seas or project power from the sea.

Over the past two decades, we focused our efforts on honing our ability to project power, and we became exceptionally good at strike. Additionally, we excelled at both maritime security and humanitarian support missions. These were the missions our country demanded and its strategy dictated. Our ability to project power thousands of miles from our own shores was underwritten by our unfettered ability to control the seas where we operated. This did not go unnoticed by nations with an interest in challenging our control of the seas, and we began to see the development of “anti-access/area denial” threats. This is the threat to which we now respond by re-embracing the core elements of sea control.

Surface warfare’s broad capability set, persistence in denied battle space, and command and control capacity make us the natural leaders in our core competencies that are so critical to winning the theater fight, and the investments we make today will position us to reassert our mastery of this domain.

Surface warfare has a long, rich history of warfighting excellence. To continue this tradition we must reapply ourselves to the fundamentals of sea control. As the director of Surface Warfare, I challenge our Navy team to focus and rededicate our energy and capacity to the core of what is surface warfare, so that we can continue to control the seas.

Rear Adm. Thomas S. Rowden is scheduled to speak at the Surface Navy Association 2014 Symposium’s “Updating the Surface Navy Vision” on Tues., Jan. 14, 2:45 to 4 p.m. EST.

  • The littoral combat ship USS Freedom (LCS 1) arrives at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Dec. 13, 2013. Freedom’s first operational deployment, a 9-month assignment forward-operating from Singapore, is the first ever deployment for a littoral combat ship and the proof-of-concept deployment for the ship class. (U.S. Navy photo by Johans Chavarro)The littoral combat ship USS Freedom (LCS 1) arrives at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Dec. 13, 2013. Freedom’s first operational deployment, a 9-month assignment forward-operating from Singapore, is the first ever deployment for a littoral combat ship and the proof-of-concept deployment for the ship class. (U.S. Navy photo by Johans Chavarro)

HMS Portland today left Plymouth bound for the South Atlantic – the second RN vessel of 2014 to head off on deployment.

HMS Portland today left Plymouth bound for the South Atlantic – the second RN vessel of 2014 to head off on deployment.

Stygian skies hung over Plymouth Sound as families and friends waved the frigate off for the next seven months.

Pictures: PO(Phot) Ray Jones, LA(Phot) Caroline Davies, and Carol Rashleigh

LET us hope that the dark clouds about to devour HMS Portland as she departed Plymouth today are not an ill omen for the ship and the 200 souls aboard.

The ship became the second Type 23 frigate to leave Devonport in four days.

Hot on the heels of HMS Somerset – bound for the warmth of the Gulf – Portland heads to expanses of the South Atlantic where she’ll take over from her sister HMS Richmond.

The seven-month tour of duty is the first by the second youngest Type 23 since a year-long revamp in Rosyth, followed by a 2013 spent regenerating and training for the mission which has now begun.

The family of CPO(Wtr) Kev Rashleigh wave goodbye to the senior rating and his ship

A small crowd braved the gathering storm to bid Portland farewell from Devil’s Point, Plymouth’s traditional send-off location.

There has been some media interest in the ship’s deployment thanks to the fact that Portland is the first major Royal Navy warship commanded by a female, Cdr Sarah West.

“I have been in the Navy for 18 years and taking this ship on deployment is the pinnacle of my career,” she said. “I have a great ship’s company and they are also looking forward to the deployment ahead.

With several commands under her belt – four minehunters, including eight and a half months in the Gulf in charge of HMS Pembroke – she knows, by and large, what the next seven months hold.

As does LS Graham Baring, an underwater warfare specialist, who’s spent one fewer year in the Mob than his commanding officer – although he’s never deployed to the South Atlantic before.

“It I an emotional time to see families waving you good bye from Devil’s Point, but I know the deployment will go quickly because we will be very busy.

“I’ll miss my wife Zoe.  We said our goodbyes already at home.  It’ll be great going to new places and sharing our knowledge with other navies. I’m excited about going and getting stuck in.’’

For a reasonable proportion of the frigate’s company this is their first deployment.

“I’m looking forward to doing everything the Navy offered – to travelling the world and doing an interesting and challenging job,” said 19-year-old ET(WE) Steven Webster from Chippenham.

“It won’t be easy not seeing my family for several months. But I’m looking forward to going seeing them on the jetty when we come back.”

Shipmate Wtr Hazel Hicks, 28, of Plymouth, has been in the Navy for two years and is also on her maiden deployment. She leaves behind her husband of six months, Darren.

“I’m used to travelling abroad and being away from my family. But being on a naval deployment is an unknown to me, therefore, it’s exciting and I’m keen to get going,” she said.

Happy +TransportTuesday with myself and +Gene Bowker!

Reshared post from +Annie Irving

Happy +TransportTuesday with myself and +Gene Bowker!
My shot today shows one of the many RORO (roll-on roll-off) transport ships that are frequent visitors to Auckland's port. You can see all the cars it was carrying lined up along the wharf.
Looking forward to seeing all your transport shots today, folks.

With a surface of 69 millions square miles, the Pacific Ocean covers nearly a third…

Reshared post from +Ivan Strydom

With a surface of 69 millions square miles, the Pacific Ocean covers nearly a third of the Earth’s surface. During World War II, military operations in the Pacific were confronted with the problem of range. This was particularly true of aerial operations. Mainland Japan was bombed on 18 April 1942 by Doolittle and his raiders, but that was a one-time effort of mostly psychological value. All of the 16 aircraft involved were lost, and 11 of the 80 raiders were either killed or captured. After that, no bombing raids were flown against the Japanese Home Islands until the second half of 1944 when B-29 long-range bombers were used from bases in China and later the Marianas islands. These raids were unescorted as no fighter had the range to escort the bombers all the way to Japan and back.

The lack of escorts for the B-29s became a growing concern. One of the solution that was considered was to have fighter launched from aircraft carriers located closer to Japan join the bombing raid. Even so, no naval fighter had enough range. The only fighter which seemed suitable for this was the North American P-51 Mustang.

The Royal Navy frigate is assisting in the international effort to remove chemical…

Reshared post from +UK Armed Forces

The Royal Navy frigate is assisting in the international effort to remove chemical stocks from Syria to stop them being used in weapons.
 
The Devonport-based Type 23 frigate will work alongside Danish, Norwegian, Russian and Chinese warships in the eastern Mediterranean to provide maritime force protection in support of the Danish and Norwegian merchant vessels tasked with transporting industrial-grade chemicals out of Syria for destruction.
 
Read more: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/hms-montrose-to-assist-in-removal-of-chemical-stocks-from-syria
 
Type 23 frigate HMS Montrose in the Mediterranean (library image) [Picture: Leading Airman (Photographer) Joel Rouse, Crown copyright]