HMNZS Thomas Currell, auxiliary minesweeper , RNZN 1939-1945

Lying in slight disrepair at Port Hutt The Chathams –

HMNZS Thomas Currell (T11) 1941–1944 Functioned throughout World War II as a minesweeper vessel. Currently beached and deteriorating on the coast of Chatham Island.

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Croatia, Ukraine Talk Military-Defence Cooperation Croatia, Ukraine Talk Military-Defence Cooperation Read more posts and click here

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Croatia, Ukraine Talk Military-Defence Cooperation1

On November 30 and December 1, Pavlo Lebedev, Minister of Defense of Ukraine and Ante Kotromanović, Minister of Defense of Croatia, were on a visit in Sevastopol.

Ministers have already met in Zagreb during the official visit of Pavlo Lebedev to Croatia in late October.

On November 30, the delegations arrived to Sevastopol and visited the Sevastopol Aviation Enterprise of the Defense Ministry of Ukraine. Within the framework of the visit, they toured some institutions and enterprises of defense industrial complex in Kharkiv, Zaporozhie and Odesa.

Croatia, Ukraine Talk Military-Defence CooperationCroatia, Ukraine Talk Military-Defence Cooperation2Croatia, Ukraine Talk Military-Defence Cooperation4Croatia, Ukraine Talk Military-Defence Cooperation5On Sunday, December 1, the delegations visited the Ternopil corvette, which has recently returned from the Mediterranean Sea after participation in the Active Endeavors counter-terrorist operation.

According to Pavlo Lebedev, the Ukrainian-Croatian military technical cooperation is developing and will continue being developed in the future as well.

“It means employment for our citizens and state budget revenues,” he stressed. “During such meetings we share experience and knowledge concerning the Armed Forces reforms, establish military technical cooperation considering our capabilities. I would like to say that the Sevastopol Aviation Enterprise got the order for helicopters repair from the Croatian Armed Forces”.

Ante Kotromanović also spoke about the development of military technical cooperation of his country with Ukraine:

“We can state our first successes in this military technical cooperation, as in Ukraine we repair our aircraft and ships,” he said.

Press Release, December 3, 2013; Image: Ukrainian MoD
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Croatia, Ukraine Talk Military-Defence Cooperation

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Croatia, Ukraine Talk Military-Defence Cooperation1

On November 30 and December 1, Pavlo Lebedev, Minister of Defense of Ukraine and Ante Kotromanović, Minister of Defense of Croatia, were on a visit in Sevastopol.

Ministers have already met in Zagreb during the official visit of Pavlo Lebedev to Croatia in late October.

On November 30, the delegations arrived to Sevastopol and visited the Sevastopol Aviation Enterprise of the Defense Ministry of Ukraine. Within the framework of the visit, they toured some institutions and enterprises of defense industrial complex in Kharkiv, Zaporozhie and Odesa.

Croatia, Ukraine Talk Military-Defence CooperationCroatia, Ukraine Talk Military-Defence Cooperation2Croatia, Ukraine Talk Military-Defence Cooperation4Croatia, Ukraine Talk Military-Defence Cooperation5On Sunday, December 1, the delegations visited the Ternopil corvette, which has recently returned from the Mediterranean Sea after participation in the Active Endeavors counter-terrorist operation.

According to Pavlo Lebedev, the Ukrainian-Croatian military technical cooperation is developing and will continue being developed in the future as well.

“It means employment for our citizens and state budget revenues,” he stressed. “During such meetings we share experience and knowledge concerning the Armed Forces reforms, establish military technical cooperation considering our capabilities. I would like to say that the Sevastopol Aviation Enterprise got the order for helicopters repair from the Croatian Armed Forces”.

Ante Kotromanović also spoke about the development of military technical cooperation of his country with Ukraine:

“We can state our first successes in this military technical cooperation, as in Ukraine we repair our aircraft and ships,” he said.

Press Release, December 3, 2013; Image: Ukrainian MoD
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. Canadian Warships to Participate in TGEX

Another post on John’s Naval, Marine and other Service news

Canadian Warships to Participate in TGEX

Six Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) warships sailed from Halifax earlier this week to participate in a Task Group Exercise (TGEX) off the Canadian Atlantic coast from November 25 to December 6.

 

“This Task Group exercise will have the added value of being a part of NORAD Exercise Amalgam Dart, proving interoperability between the Royal Canadian Navy, the Royal Canadian Air Force and the U.S. Air Force,” said Rear-Admiral John Newton, Commander Maritime Forces Atlantic. “Such training strengthens ties and understanding amongst allies, improving our ability to successfully work together on operations.”

RCN units participating in the exercise include Her Majesty’s Canadian Ships Iroquois, Ville de Québec, Halifax, Fredericton and Kingston, and Her Majesty’s Canadian Submarine Windsor. The ships will be supported by CH-124 Sea King helicopters from 12 Wing Shearwater.

“Task Group exercises strengthen Canada’s ability to work on a wide range of potential operations,” explained Commodore Scott Bishop, Commander Canadian Fleet Atlantic. “Exercises like TGEX offer valuable training for the RCN to maintain readiness and deploy when called upon by the Government of Canada.”

The Royal Canadian Air Force will participate in Exercise Amalgam Dart, together with the RCN and the United States Air Force, from December 3 to 5, with the following aircraft: a CC-130 Hercules from 8 Wing Trenton, a CP-140 Aurora long-range patrol aircraft from 14 Wing Greenwood, and CF-188 Hornets from 3 Wing Bagotville, augmented by personnel from 22 Wing North Bay.
NORAD Exercise Amalgam Dart offers an opportunity to hone skills in intercept and identification procedures used to respond to any potential air threat, as well as air-to-air refueling procedures.

Press Release, December 03, 2013; Image: Canadian Navy
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Solomon Islands Rendered Safer

Another post on John’s Naval, Marine and other Service news

.

Solomon Islands Rendered Safer

Solomon Islands Rendered Safer

Operation RENDER SAFE, the Australian Defence Force (ADF) Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) mission in Solomon Islands has been a “spectacular success” according to the head of the Task Force Commander, Commander Doug Griffiths.

 

Commander Griffiths said the team located more than 10,000 items of unexploded World War II ordnance in just three weeks, finishing on December 2.
The operation consisted of a Task Force of nearly 200 Explosive Ordnance Disposal specialists and support staff from the ADF, New Zealand Defence Force, Canadian Armed Forces, the United States Navy and the Royal Solomon Islands Police Force.
The 10,000 items located by the Task Force since October 29 ranged from 1000lb bombs down to individual hand and rifle grenades.
While the ordnance was predominantly US and Japanese, a range of other material was found including some French and British ordnance.
These items were “rendered safe”, usually by a controlled explosion, in location or at the Solomon Islands main EOD site near the nation’s capital Honiara.
Commander Griffiths said the results of the combined, Joint Task Force exceeded all expectations.

“I understand that the local Police deal with around 10,000 items per year, so for us to locate 10,000 in three weeks is a real credit not just to us but also the partnership we have had with the local Police and communities,” Commander Griffiths said.
“These extraordinary numbers are also a reflection of the high contamination of some parts of Solomons with unexploded ordnance – we are working here with global experts who estimate that some areas in Solomons have among the worst explosive ordnance contamination in the world – even more contaminated with unexploded ordnance than Laos or Cambodia.
“Given that these items have been here for around 70 years, the assistance we have had from local villages and communities in finding them has been critical.
“For instance, last week we had a Canadian team working in the mountains more than two kilometres away from the nearest logging track, while at the same time we had an Australian team working a few metres from the edge of Henderson Field airport in the capital of Honiara.
“In both cases it was information gained from the local community that led us to these sites.”

Commander Griffiths said ships and divers had also surveyed more than 25 square-kilometres of seabed, including 8km of beachfront near Honiara and numerous channels in the Russell Islands.

“Our Task Force members have no shortage of battlefield experience in Iraq, Afghanistan, East Timor, Bosnia, Burundi, Somalia, Sudan and a multitude of other conflict zones across most continents but the sheer volume of items in such a short period of time has certainly provided a challenge,” he said.
“Our teams were finding high explosive shells with pristine fuses still in their packaging so the threat of injury or death to the locals if they accidently set one of these off was, and still is, real.
“One of our clearance divers summed it up pretty well when he said that for us the war finished 70 years ago but Solomon Islanders have been living with it ever since.”

Commander Griffiths said Task Force members are now returning home to Australia, New Zealand, the United States and Canada knowing that they have freed up areas of land and seabed that are now safer for people to farm, build houses, fish and play.

“With the local population just passing 500,000 and growing rapidly these areas will be needed so that the Solomons can grow with confidence and safety,” he said.
“Along the way we have all had the opportunity to learn more about the Solomon Islands people and culture and I know all Task Force members have enjoyed that as much as they have enjoyed getting results on the job.”

Press Release, December 03, 2013; Image: Australian Navy
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Solomon Islands Rendered Safer

Another post on John’s Naval, Marine and other Service news

.

Solomon Islands Rendered Safer

Solomon Islands Rendered Safer

Operation RENDER SAFE, the Australian Defence Force (ADF) Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) mission in Solomon Islands has been a “spectacular success” according to the head of the Task Force Commander, Commander Doug Griffiths.

 

Commander Griffiths said the team located more than 10,000 items of unexploded World War II ordnance in just three weeks, finishing on December 2.
The operation consisted of a Task Force of nearly 200 Explosive Ordnance Disposal specialists and support staff from the ADF, New Zealand Defence Force, Canadian Armed Forces, the United States Navy and the Royal Solomon Islands Police Force.
The 10,000 items located by the Task Force since October 29 ranged from 1000lb bombs down to individual hand and rifle grenades.
While the ordnance was predominantly US and Japanese, a range of other material was found including some French and British ordnance.
These items were “rendered safe”, usually by a controlled explosion, in location or at the Solomon Islands main EOD site near the nation’s capital Honiara.
Commander Griffiths said the results of the combined, Joint Task Force exceeded all expectations.

“I understand that the local Police deal with around 10,000 items per year, so for us to locate 10,000 in three weeks is a real credit not just to us but also the partnership we have had with the local Police and communities,” Commander Griffiths said.
“These extraordinary numbers are also a reflection of the high contamination of some parts of Solomons with unexploded ordnance – we are working here with global experts who estimate that some areas in Solomons have among the worst explosive ordnance contamination in the world – even more contaminated with unexploded ordnance than Laos or Cambodia.
“Given that these items have been here for around 70 years, the assistance we have had from local villages and communities in finding them has been critical.
“For instance, last week we had a Canadian team working in the mountains more than two kilometres away from the nearest logging track, while at the same time we had an Australian team working a few metres from the edge of Henderson Field airport in the capital of Honiara.
“In both cases it was information gained from the local community that led us to these sites.”

Commander Griffiths said ships and divers had also surveyed more than 25 square-kilometres of seabed, including 8km of beachfront near Honiara and numerous channels in the Russell Islands.

“Our Task Force members have no shortage of battlefield experience in Iraq, Afghanistan, East Timor, Bosnia, Burundi, Somalia, Sudan and a multitude of other conflict zones across most continents but the sheer volume of items in such a short period of time has certainly provided a challenge,” he said.
“Our teams were finding high explosive shells with pristine fuses still in their packaging so the threat of injury or death to the locals if they accidently set one of these off was, and still is, real.
“One of our clearance divers summed it up pretty well when he said that for us the war finished 70 years ago but Solomon Islanders have been living with it ever since.”

Commander Griffiths said Task Force members are now returning home to Australia, New Zealand, the United States and Canada knowing that they have freed up areas of land and seabed that are now safer for people to farm, build houses, fish and play.

“With the local population just passing 500,000 and growing rapidly these areas will be needed so that the Solomons can grow with confidence and safety,” he said.
“Along the way we have all had the opportunity to learn more about the Solomon Islands people and culture and I know all Task Force members have enjoyed that as much as they have enjoyed getting results on the job.”

Press Release, December 03, 2013; Image: Australian Navy
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Destroyers of old, during my time in the…

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. Hetman Sahaydachnyi Praised for Contribution to NATO’s Anti-Piracy Efforts

Another post on John’s Naval, Marine and other Service news

Hetman Sahaydachnyi Praised for Contribution to NATO's Anti-Piracy Efforts

Leaders of the tactical group of the Ocean Shield operation discussed the operation results aboard the Ukrainian frigate Hetman Sahaydachnyi in relation to the rotation term completion.

 

The parties analyzed the interoperability and summarized the joint work during this counter-piracy operation.
Commodore Henning Amundsen, commander of tactical group, stressed:

 “Since the Ukrainian national contingent has joined the operation, we haven’t had any pirate attacks in the Gulf of Aden. Your crew is well motivated and uses their best efforts in the counter-piracy operations.”

Commodore wished the Ukrainian personnel good luck in Ocean Shield and Atalanta operations.
Now, the ship stays in the open sea and continues its routine activities.

Press Release, December 3, 2013; Image: Ukrainian MoD
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. UK: HMS Explorer Joins Forces with Police

Another post on John’s Naval, Marine and other Service news

HMS Explorer Joins Forces with Police

University boat HMS Explorer joined forces with police on the Humber – one of a series of demonstrations to movers and shakers in East Yorkshire. The small patrol craft, which serves Yorkshire Universities Royal Naval Unit, has been running various ‘sea days’ for civic and business leaders in the Hull area to give them a taste of life in the Senior Service.

 

As one of the Royal Navy’s smallest vessels – not 21 metres long, 49 tonnes – it’s unusual for HMS Explorer to dwarf anything.
But here she is ploughing the (rather murky) waters of the Humber alongside an inshore patrol boat from Humberside Police.
And overhead – from whence these photographs were taken – the force’s helicopter as the Royal Navy and constabulary gave civic, business and political leaders in the region a taste of what they can do together.
Based up the Humber in Kingston-upon-Hull, Explorer acts first and foremost as the training vessel of Yorkshire Universities Royal Naval Unit – covering centres of higher learning in Hull, Leeds, Sheffield, York and Bradford.
With the autumn term in full swing, Explorer has been holding various ‘sea days’ to showcase what the RN does in a part of the UK major warships don’t visit too often.

“Building links with the local community is an important aspect of URNU activity – it offers an opportunity to re-affirm the naval ethos among our Officer Cadets and to engage with interesting personalities,” said Explorer’s Commanding Officer Lt Dafydd Bryden.

Guests have included the Admiral of the Humber (aka the Lord Mayor of Kingston-upon-Hull), the High Sheriffs of both East and West Yorkshire as well as a selection of business leaders and the RN’s Regional Commander for Northern England, Cdre Dickie Baum.

“P2000s are excellent vessels for showcasing the Royal Navy in the public eye,” said Cdre Baum.
“Quite often they can access small ports that would be impossible for larger naval vessels.
“Their regional presence throughout the United Kingdom is invaluable when it comes to developing a wider understanding of the Royal Navy.”

Joining Explorer for the link-up with the police launch was Sub Lt Chris Hughes, a former leading regulator in the Royal Navy who joined the RNR upon leaving the Service – and Humberside Police, with whom he serves as a constable with the force’s port and maritime protection group.

“Instructing URNU cadets as a reservist training officer is a real pleasure and has complemented my career with Humberside Police.
“I joined the Maritime Reserve as an URNU Training Officer, the access to instructional training I have received has been excellent, I have achieved maritime qualifications such as RYA Cruising Instructor that I use with both with my day job and instructing URNU cadets.”

Press Release, December 03, 2013; Image: Royal Navy
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Solomon Islands Rendered Safer

Another post on John’s Naval, Marine and other Service news

.

Solomon Islands Rendered Safer

Solomon Islands Rendered Safer

Operation RENDER SAFE, the Australian Defence Force (ADF) Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) mission in Solomon Islands has been a “spectacular success” according to the head of the Task Force Commander, Commander Doug Griffiths.

 

Commander Griffiths said the team located more than 10,000 items of unexploded World War II ordnance in just three weeks, finishing on December 2.
The operation consisted of a Task Force of nearly 200 Explosive Ordnance Disposal specialists and support staff from the ADF, New Zealand Defence Force, Canadian Armed Forces, the United States Navy and the Royal Solomon Islands Police Force.
The 10,000 items located by the Task Force since October 29 ranged from 1000lb bombs down to individual hand and rifle grenades.
While the ordnance was predominantly US and Japanese, a range of other material was found including some French and British ordnance.
These items were “rendered safe”, usually by a controlled explosion, in location or at the Solomon Islands main EOD site near the nation’s capital Honiara.
Commander Griffiths said the results of the combined, Joint Task Force exceeded all expectations.

“I understand that the local Police deal with around 10,000 items per year, so for us to locate 10,000 in three weeks is a real credit not just to us but also the partnership we have had with the local Police and communities,” Commander Griffiths said.
“These extraordinary numbers are also a reflection of the high contamination of some parts of Solomons with unexploded ordnance – we are working here with global experts who estimate that some areas in Solomons have among the worst explosive ordnance contamination in the world – even more contaminated with unexploded ordnance than Laos or Cambodia.
“Given that these items have been here for around 70 years, the assistance we have had from local villages and communities in finding them has been critical.
“For instance, last week we had a Canadian team working in the mountains more than two kilometres away from the nearest logging track, while at the same time we had an Australian team working a few metres from the edge of Henderson Field airport in the capital of Honiara.
“In both cases it was information gained from the local community that led us to these sites.”

Commander Griffiths said ships and divers had also surveyed more than 25 square-kilometres of seabed, including 8km of beachfront near Honiara and numerous channels in the Russell Islands.

“Our Task Force members have no shortage of battlefield experience in Iraq, Afghanistan, East Timor, Bosnia, Burundi, Somalia, Sudan and a multitude of other conflict zones across most continents but the sheer volume of items in such a short period of time has certainly provided a challenge,” he said.
“Our teams were finding high explosive shells with pristine fuses still in their packaging so the threat of injury or death to the locals if they accidently set one of these off was, and still is, real.
“One of our clearance divers summed it up pretty well when he said that for us the war finished 70 years ago but Solomon Islanders have been living with it ever since.”

Commander Griffiths said Task Force members are now returning home to Australia, New Zealand, the United States and Canada knowing that they have freed up areas of land and seabed that are now safer for people to farm, build houses, fish and play.

“With the local population just passing 500,000 and growing rapidly these areas will be needed so that the Solomons can grow with confidence and safety,” he said.
“Along the way we have all had the opportunity to learn more about the Solomon Islands people and culture and I know all Task Force members have enjoyed that as much as they have enjoyed getting results on the job.”

Press Release, December 03, 2013; Image: Australian Navy
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