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Posted on Friday, October 11, 2013 by Martin Cox

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CITY OF ADELAIDE (HMS CARRICK) Photo National Historic Ships UK mounted on her barge for transport to London

On Friday, 18 October 2013, the world’s oldest clipper ship CITY OF ADELAIDE will be officially renamed at a ceremony presided over by His Royal Highness, The Duke of  Edinburgh at the Old Royal Naval College, Greenwich, London. The event will bring CITY OF ADELAIDE close to the historic clipper CUTTY SARK on the River Thames.
Built in 1864, the Royal Navy purchased the CITY OF ADELAIDE in 1923 and renamed her HMS CARRICK to avoid confusion with the new cruiser HMAS ADELAIDE that had just been commissioned in the Royal Australian Navy. In 2001 the decision was taken to revert to her original name, however no formal renaming ceremony was performed.
CITY OF ADELAIDE was specifically designed and built as a passenger ship in 1864 to bring migrants to South Australia from Britain, the clipper was originally 50% South Australian, 25% Scottish, and 25% English owned.  In 1991 the ship sank at the Princes Dock, Glasgow, and lay on the bottom of the River Clyde for a year before being raised and taken to Irvine.
The CITY OF ADELAIDE  remained at the Scottish Maritime Museum in Irvine since it was salvaged in 1992, with the cost of repairs put in excess of £10m and with her slip needing to be vacated, it looked as though the ship would be demolished. A rescue campaign was mounted by rival consortiums from Adelaide, Australia and from Sunderland, England with the Australian group prevailing in their bid for ownership. CITY OF ADELAIDE was loaded on to a pontoon barge for her initial journey from Scotland to London where she will later be loaded on to a heavy lift ship to be transported to Australia.

CITY OF ADELAIDE departing Scotland September 20, 2013, Photo courtesy Peter Roberts

In a recent press release from the Government of South Australia:
“The iconic vessel is a symbol of the marked relationship between South Australia the United Kingdom. An estimated 1/4 million Australians today are descendants of passengers who made the long and arduous voyage to the fledgling colony. Peter Roberts, one of the volunteers bringing the clipper to South Australia, and a descendant of Cornish miners who migrated to the Moonta copper mines in South Australia in 1873 said, “as the only surviving sailing ship that gave regular passenger and cargo service between Europe and Australia, she represents a whole foundation era of Australian social, economic and maritime history, and the physical link between Britain and Australia.”
“The ‘Clipper Age’ brought the development of a highly skilled set of sailors and craftsmen, and composite clippers like the ‘City of Adelaide’ were at the technological forefront of ship-design and shipbuilding. BAE Systems, Ultra Electronics and ASC are today at the forefront of modern naval ship building and repair in South Australia, and are therefore proud to be associated with the CITY OF ADELAIDE renaming ceremony. Shipbuilding in South Australia began in 1803 with the schooner INDEPENDENCE. Now, 210 years on, South Australia is home to Australia’s premier naval industry hub, Techport Australia.”
More than £711,000 (AU$1.2 million) of British taxpayers’ money has already been spent towards the CITY OF ADELAIDE 1600km journey to Port Adelaide, however, recent press reports from Australia suggest that plans to return the ship to Adelaide could be in limbo as the new coalition government of Australia assesses the heritage value of the vessel. The previous Labor Government had promised The City of Adelaide Preservation Trust some AU$850,000 to cover the costs associate with her transportation from the London to Adelaide. The Trust, confident that the Coalition will indeed honour that commitment was not yet able to arrange for the heavy-lift ship to bring her to Adelaide.
 
 

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New post (Australia boat arrivals slow as Indonesia arrests smugglers) has been published on (Australia boat arrivals slow as Indonesia arrests smugglers) Click link to see all posts – http://www.navyandmarinenews.jcandmei.com/ – Australia said Friday that just one asylum-seeker boat had been intercepted over the past week, marking a sharp reduction under the government’s hardline boatpeople policy, while eight alleged people smugglers have been arrested in Indonesia.

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File photo: An Australian navy ship shadows a boat (R) believed to be carrying asylum-seekers sailing towards Australian waters. (AFP/Basarnas)

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SYDNEY: Australia said Friday just one asylum-seeker boat has been intercepted over the past week, marking a sharp reduction under the government’s hardline policy, while eight alleged people-smugglers were arrested in Indonesia.
Prime Minister Tony Abbott’s vow to “Stop the Boats” was a centrepiece of his recent election campaign and Immigration Minister Scott Morrison said the policies were working.
Under Operation Sovereign Borders, 215 people had been intercepted in the last three weeks, significantly down on the thousands who were routinely arriving each month earlier this year.
“The experience of people confronting our policies and our resolve is what makes the difference,” Morrison said in a weekly briefing.
The policies include turning back people-smuggling boats to Indonesia and plans to pre-emptively buy rickety fishing vessels and pay villagers for intelligence.
The government has also maintained the policies of the old Labor administration in which all asylum-seekers arriving by boat are sent to Papua New Guinea or Nauru in the Pacific for processing and resettlement.
Morrison refused to say if any boats had been towed back to Indonesia, their usual point of departure.
“The practice in these briefings is not to comment on operations that might jeopardise current or future operations, so I won’t be commenting on those matters,” he said.
The government has come under fire for not providing the public with more timely details on boat arrivals or tow backs, but Abbott denied trying to prevent any bad publicity.
“Our job is to stop the boats. It’s not to provide sport. It’s not to provide copy. It’s not to start an argument,” he said.
“The job of the government is to get things done and what we want to get done as quickly as we humanly can is this urgent national imperative of stopping the boats.”
At the same briefing, Australian Federal Police Commissioner Tony Negus said cooperation with Indonesia had resulted in 17 people-smuggling attempts being halted since September 8, preventing more than 500 suspected asylum-seekers from making boat journeys.
He added that Indonesian police had recently made eight arrests, including three “high-value targets” involved in organising operations.
“Importantly, three high-value targets — these are people who are facilitators and organisers within Indonesia who put people on those boats,” he said.
“They’ll be charged with organising multiple ventures to Australia.”
Indonesian police were also seeking an arrest warrant for a suspected people-smuggling kingpin, he added, without going into further details.
“We’re confident we have a good lead on this individual,” said Negus, who has just returned from high-level talks in Jakarta.
Meanwhile, a High Court on Friday upheld the government’s power to impose mandatory prison terms for convicted people-smugglers.
The case was brought by a crew member of a boat which ferried 52 asylum-seekers to Australia in 2010 with Bonan Darius Magaming appealing his five-year jail term, the mandatory minimum sentence.
But the court, by a majority, ruled the mandatory sentencing provision in the Migration Act was lawful, a move welcomed by Morrison.
“If people seek to break those laws then they can expect to suffer the consequences of those penalties,” he told reporters.

– AFP/xq

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Britain’s Lord Nelson now en route to Auckland 

‘Lord Nelson and Sydney Harbour Bridge’    © www.tallshipstock.com

Britain’s accessible tall ship Lord Nelson has departed Sydney Harbour bound for Auckland, New Zealand, at the end of a highly successful inaugural visit to Australia. 
The 55-metre square rigged vessel, owned by UK charity, the Jubilee Sailing Trust, is crewed by disabled and able bodied people alike, thanks to simple but effective features in the design of the ship, including a speaking compass, braille signage, hearing loops, wheelchair lifts between decks and a bowsprit wide enough to accommodate a wheelchair so every crew member can have their ‘King of the World’ moment. 
Lord Nelson is now en route to Auckland having led the fleet across the start line today for the Tall Ships Race from Sydney to New Zealand’s City of Sails. 
She proved a huge hit with Australian visitors during port visits to Fremantle, Albany, Adelaide, Melbourne, Hobart and Sydney, where she represented UK tall ships at last weekend’s Royal Australian Navy International Fleet Review attended by HRH Prince Harry. 
This will be the first visit to New Zealand for the ship and Lord Nelson is due to arrive in Auckland on 25 October, and will be open to the public on 26 and 27 October while she is berthed with the rest of the international tall ships fleet at Queens and Princes Wharves. 
Berths sold out for all the Australian voyages and now Kiwis have a unique opportunity to sail on board Lord Nelson as she undertakes voyages from Auckland to Wellington, via the stunning Coromandel Peninsula and Cook Strait; from the nation’s capital to the South Island and the picturesque port of Nelson; from there back to Auckland via the Marlborough Sounds and a final voyage around the North Island before setting sail on 15 December bound for South America. 
Lord Nelson is currently mid-way through a two-year 50,000-mile global voyage, the Norton Rose Fulbright Sail the World Challenge, which will see the vessel become the first accessible tall ship to complete a circumnavigation via the three Great Capes: the Cape of Good Hope, Cape Leeuwin and the infamous Cape Horn. During the worldwide voyage, the ship and her crew aim to promote the messages of equality and inclusion in more than 30 ports of call. 
Jubilee Sailing Trust’s CEO, Alex Lochrane, said, ‘Lord Nelson’s visit to Australia has been a huge success in terms of introducing tall ship sailing to a new audience. This whole voyage came about because of the invitation from the Royal Australian Navy to join its centenary celebrations in Sydney Harbour this weekend, so to them we extend our thanks for inviting us to be part of such a fantastic spectacle. 
‘The visit to Australia would not have been possible without a great deal of support from organisations within the country so we also thank our many new friends for their time and energy, including our principal supporter, Norton Rose Fulbright, and those who have supported the charity in such a way as to enable others, both disabled and able bodied, to sail on board Lord Nelson. For many it has been a life-changing and life-affirming opportunity.’ 
Norton Rose Fulbright, which has five offices in Australia, is supporting this unique global voyage under their banner of ‘All abilities. All aboard.’ The global legal practice supports the Jubilee Sailing Trust’s values of diversity, inclusion and integration. 
Norton Rose Fulbright Australia Managing Partner, Wayne Spanner, said, ‘To celebrate Lord Nelson’s arrival in Sydney we invited partners, clients and their families to join us for a Family Day at the Maritime Museum in Sydney’s Darling Harbour. It was heartening to see more than 280 people turn out for what was a spectacular spring day by the water. This was a great opportunity for our networks to hear anecdotes from the crew, explore Lord Nelson and share in the adventure of the Norton Rose Fulbright Sail the World Challenge.’ 
One New Zealander is among the more than 500 people from 25 countries, approximately half of whom are physically disabled and include 54 wheelchair users, who have already taken part in the journey which set off from Southampton, UK, in October 2012, riding the wave of the success of the London 2012 Paralympic Games. The ship is due to arrive back in the UK in September 2014. 
Berths are available for both able bodied and physically disabled people for the voyages in New Zealand. A ‘buddy’ system on board pairs able bodied and disabled crew to offer mutual help and support during the passage. The lower age limit is 16 and there is no upper age limit. 
No sailing experience is necessary as the permanent crew will give all the training and guidance needed to get the most out of the voyage, whether that is showing a crew member how to climb the rigging, steer the ship or haul on a rope to help set the sails. The ethos on board is to focus on what each person is capable of, rather than what they can’t do. 
As well as Lord Nelson, Jubilee Sailing Trust operates a second adapted tall ship, Tenacious, and more than 37,000 people have sailed with the organisation since it was founded in 1978, 14,000 of whom are physically disabled, including 5,000 wheelchair users. 
Lord Nelson’s New Zealand voyages (dates for crew joining and leaving the ship) 
27 October – 5 November: Auckland to Wellington 

8 November – 17 November: Wellington to Nelson 

18 November – 27 November: Nelson to Auckland 

28 November – 6 December: Auckland to Auckland 
STS Lord Nelson Facts and Figures 
Length: 55 metres 

Beam: 9 metres 

Deck to fore masthead: 31 metres 

Sail area: 1,024m2 

Number of sails: 18 

Fresh water capacity: 22 tonnes 

Launched: 15 October 1985 

Max speed under sail: 10 knots 

Crew: 50 comprising: 8 permanent crew, 2 bosun’s mates, 1 cook’s assistant, 1 cadet, 38 voyage (paying) crew; 17 may be physically disabled and 4 may be wheelchair users 
JST website
by Heather Ewing 
    

 
http://www.sail-world.com/index.cfm?nid=115620
2:36 PM Thu 10 Oct 2013GMT 

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Last updated 13:40 11/10/2013

 
 
 

 
 

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PAINT ME: Russian super yacht ‘A’ sticks out among the warships at Auckland’s Devonport Navy Base.

DARRIN ZAMMIT LUPI/ Reuters
ALL STYLE: Andrey Melnichenko’s super yacht alongside in Malta.
 

A stunning white $350 million superyacht is now high and dry in a sea of navy grey in the drydock at Auckland’s Devonport base being prepared for a $30 million re-paint.
The Russian billionaire Andrey Melnichenko has dry-docked his 119-metre long and 5959 gross tons ship called simply “A”, in the Calliope Dock.
It’s a case of history coming full circle – the dry-dock was built in 1888 to service Royal Navy ships amid New Zealand fear that imperial Russia was going to invade.
The superyacht slipped into Auckland last month after a paint job that went wrong in the United States.
Melnichenko was so peeved by the “lines and sags” in the earlier job he has filed a suit in New Jersey against Akzo Nobel – the company that owns the US version of Dulux paints – for US$100 million (NZ$120m) in damages, Britain’s Daily Mail reported.
Part of Melnichenko’s claim included the cost of a replacement vessel charter while his yacht was re-painted.
Documents filed at the court state: “In addition to attorney’s fees and costs, these damages represent over US$100m in ascertainable losses on the part of the plaintiff,” the Daily Mail reported.
“A” is a metre longer than New Zealand’s frigates Te Kaha and Te Mana which weight in at 3600 tons each.
“A” was named after Melnichenko’s Serbian model wife Aleksandra.
It has 23,600 square feet of living space, and the ship, which looks like a cross between a stealth destroyer and a submarine, was designed to be in harmony with the sea and nature.
It can reach speeds up to 23 knots, has a range of 4250 nautical miles, and sports all the latest navigation and entertainment equipment.
“A” could accommodate 14 guests in one owner’s suite and up to 37 crew members onboard. It had six guest suites.
Calliope Dock is part of the Devonport naval base but is managed by leading British marine engineering firm, Babcock International.
It can accommodate vessels up to 170 metres in length and 22.5 metres beam. It carries out 25 dry-dockings each year with the range of vessels including cargo and cruise ships, fishing vessels, superyachts as well as navy warships and support vessels.
One of the first ships to use it was HMS Calliope, the only naval ship to survive Samoa’s 1889 cyclone which sank or destroyed seven American and German warships in Apia harbour.
– © Fairfax NZ News

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Despite the rough weather conditions, the crew of the Al Mansour Vessel extended humanitarian aid to the boat crew, reported Oman News Agency (ONA). Al Mansour engineers also provided the required technical assistance and dragged the boat to the Al Halaniyat Islands. The boat was then tugged by RNO’s Musandam to Salalah Port and handed over to the Royal Oman Police (ROP) Coast Guard.

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