War hero’s benefits axed – because he was selling POPPIES

Is this what the government mean by the military covenant?

Accepting this is the Mirror and the full facts are not verified, is this kind of treatment acceptable?
06 12 2013 10 48 45 600x801 Is this what the government mean by the military covenant?

The post Is this what the government mean by the military covenant? appeared first on Think Defence.

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MHI to Build 83,000 cu.m LPG Carrier for Astomos Energy

File MHI-built LPG carrier: Photo MHI

MarineLink.com

Friday, December 06, 2013, 2:41 AM
MHI-built LPG carrier: Photo MHI
Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI) has received an order for a very large liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) carrier able to navigate the Panama Canal from Astomos Energy Corp.
The vessel is to feature MHI’s world-class energy efficiency and outstanding versatility enabling it to flexibly accommodate the requirements of major LPG terminals. Completion and delivery are scheduled for the second half of 2015.

The LPG carrier is to be built at MHI’s Nagasaki Shipyard & Machinery Works, and will measure 230.0 meters (m) in length overall (LOA), 36.6m in width and 11.1m in draft, with gross tonnage of 48,300 tons (t) and deadweight tonnage of 51,100t. The ship will have a capacity to carry up to 83,000 cubic meters (m3) of LPG.

With the unfurling of the “shale gas revolution” in the United States, demand to transport LPG produced in North America is projected to increase in the global market, including East Asia. In tandem with market expansion, a trend is also under way toward longer transport distances. MHI’s LPG carrier ordered by Astomos Energy can accommodate these dual needs, augmented by its specifications enabling passage through the newly expanding Panama Canal. 



The shipbuilder says that the adoption of MHI’s unique hull design and other features provide the carrier with superlative fuel efficiency and outstanding adaptability to the connecting conditions of LPG terminals. 


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Singapore Orders Two Subs from ThyssenKrupp

Singapore Orders Two Subs from ThyssenKrupp

ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems, a company of ThyssenKrupp Industrial Solutions, has signed a contract for the delivery of two submarines of HDW Class 218SG to Singapore.

 

HDW Class 218SG is a customised design from ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems. The submarines, which will be fitted out with an air independent propulsion system, are going to be built at the Kiel premises of ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems.
Compared to the present ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems submarines, the new design has been customised to house additional equipment for present and future operational requirements. Special attention has also been paid to the ultra-modern layout of the tailor-made Combat System of these submarines. ST Electronics, being part of the ST Engineering group, will co-develop such Combat System with Atlas Elektronik GmbH.

Dr. Hans Christoph Atzpodien, Chairman of the Management Board of Business Area Industrial Solutions of ThyssenKrupp AG, underlines the importance of the order: “We very much look forward to continue the co-operation with the Republic of Singapore Navy which has already been a customer of ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems. The new order is an affirmation of our high-end products and services and will further strengthen our position as a world market leader in the sector of non-nuclear submarines. The contract does not only safeguard jobs at ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems, but also several hundred jobs at subcontractors.”

Press Release, December 6, 2013; Image:
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Scorpio Bulkers Lay Out Another US$157-Million on New Ships

MarineLink.com

Thursday, December 05, 2013
Photo courtesy of Scorpio Bulkers
File Photo courtesy of Scorpio Bulkers
Scorpio Bulkers Inc. has entered into agreements to purchase five Kamsarmax dry bulk vessels currently under construction in a Chinese shipyard as listed below:

Yard                                                                              DWT            Delivery
Hudong-Zhonghua Shipbuilding (Group) CO., LTD.     82,000         Q3-15    
Hudong-Zhonghua Shipbuilding (Group) CO., LTD.     82,000         Q3-15    
Hudong-Zhonghua Shipbuilding (Group) CO., LTD.     82,000         Q4-15    
Hudong-Zhonghua Shipbuilding (Group) CO., LTD.     82,000         Q1-16    
Hudong-Zhonghua Shipbuilding (Group) CO., LTD.     82,000         Q1-16    

The total purchase price for the vessels is approximately US$157 million.

About Scorpio Bulkers Inc.
Scorpio Bulkers Inc. is a provider of marine transportation of dry bulk commodities. Scorpio Bulkers Inc. has contracted and agreed to purchase 28 Ultramax, 21 Kamsarmax and three Capesize newbuilding dry bulk vessels to be delivered starting from the second quarter of 2014 from shipyards in Japan, China and Romania.

http://www.scorpiobulkers.com

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Air-Independent Propulsion: Fincantieri, Nuvera, Collaborate

File Megayacht: Photo courtesy of Nuvera

MarineLink.com

Thursday, December 05, 2013
Megayacht: Photo courtesy of Nuvera
US-based Nuvera Fuel Cells says it will be working with Italian shipbuilder, Fincantieri, on a program to power hi-end marine vessels with advanced fuel cell technology. Nuvera has been commissioned to produce and deliver eight of its Orion™ fuel cell stacks (total power 260 kW), which will be used as range extenders for use on marine vessels.
Nuvera’s fuel cell auxiliary power units will provide marine vessels with air-independent propulsion (AIP). This is the same technology used in non-nuclear submarines, which allows them to operate without the need to surface for oxygen. AIP generates electricity, which in turn drives an electric motor for propulsion or for recharging the boat’s batteries. The outcome of using this technology is silent operation, a major benefit in the world of luxury sea travel.

Interest in hydrogen fuel cells for marine applications has grown as the marine industry looks for new ways to tackle environmental concerns and improve engine-reliability. The usage of hydrogen fuel cells in marine vessels reduces the exhaust emissions, vibrations, noise, and costs associated with diesel-powered sea travel.

Orion fuel cell stacks are Nuvera’s line of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), which offer best-in-class power density in sizes ranging from 10 to 300 kW. Orion offers superior performance and durability in a compact package that can be integrated into industrial mobility, automotive, aerospace, and marine applications.

The program is scheduled to begin December 2013. Nuvera is aiming to deliver all eight Orion fuel cell stack prototype units by mid-2014.

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An all-electric, fuel cell-powered, unmanned aerial system (UAS) aircraft has been successfully launched from the submerged ‘USS Providence’ (SSN 719)

MarineLink.com

Thursday, December 05, 2013
File Submarine Launches Aircraft: Photo credit US NRL
Submarine Launches Aircraft: Photo credit US NRL
An all-electric, fuel cell-powered, unmanned aerial system (UAS) aircraft has been successfully launched from the submerged ‘USS Providence’ (SSN 719) & flew a several hour mission demonstrating live video capabilities streamed back to the submarine, surface support vessels and Norfolk base before landing at the Naval Sea Systems Command Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center (AUTEC), Andros, Bahamas.

From concept to fleet demonstration, the Navy says this idea took less than six years to produce in a collaboration between the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) with funding from SwampWorks at the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and the Department of Defense Rapid Reaction Technology Office (DoD/RRTO).

The successful submerged launch of a remotely deployed UAS offers a pathway to providing mission critical intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) capabilities to the U.S. Navy’s submarine force.

The NRL developed aircraft XFC UAS – eXperimental Fuel Cell Unmanned Aerial System – was fired from the submarine’s torpedo tube using a ‘Sea Robin’ launch vehicle system. The Sea Robin launch system was designed to fit within an empty Tomahawk launch canister (TLC) used for launching Tomahawk cruise missiles already familiar to submarine sailors.

Once deployed from the TLC, the Sea Robin launch vehicle with integrated XFC rose to the ocean surface where it appeared as a spar buoy. Upon command of Providence Commanding Officer, the XFC then vertically launched from Sea Robin.

The XFC aircraft is a fully autonomous, all electric fuel cell powered folding wing UAS with an endurance of greater than six hours. The non-hybridized power plant supports the propulsion system and payload for a flight endurance that enables relatively low cost, low altitude, ISR missions. The XFC UAS uses an electrically assisted take off system which lifts the plane vertically out of its container and therefore, enables a very small footprint launch such as from a pickup truck or small surface vessel.
 

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USNS Howard O. Lorenzen Passes Final Review

USNS Howard O. Lorenzen Concludes Final Contract Trials

The missile range instrumentation ship USNS Howard O. Lorenzen (T-AGM 25) successfully completed its final contract trials (FCT) in San Diego, the U.S. Navy announced, Dec. 5.

 

FCTs, run by the Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV), is the final review in a series of post-delivery tests and trials exercising all aspects of the vessel and its systems, including main propulsion, damage control, supply, deck, navigation, habitability, electrical systems and operations. INSURV officials monitored the successful demonstration of the ship’s systems including both in-port and at-sea testing.
Constructed by VT Halter Marine in Pascagoula, Miss., T-AGM 25 and its Cobra Judy Replacement (CJR) radar system will be the replacement for USNS Observation Island., which was launched in 1953. CJR will provide worldwide, high-quality, dual-band radar data in support of ballistic missile treaty verification.
The crew consists of civilian mariners that operate the ship and an Air Force operations and maintenance crew to operate the mission radars.

“The crew demonstrated their professionalism and dedication throughout many weeks of hard work to ensure the successful completion of the final contract trials, as assessed by INSURV,” said Capt. Roderick Wester, CJR major program manager, Program Executive Office for Integrated Warfare Systems (PEO IWS). “Captain Patrick Christian, the ship’s master, thoroughly prepared his crew and ensured the highest level of material readiness for Howard O. Lorenzen.”

CJR is a PEO IWS program. Design and construction of T-AGM 25 was managed by PEO Ships. The Navy will transfer the vessel to the U.S. Air Force for operations and maintenance once the ship reaches initial operational capability in 2014.
PEO IWS, an affiliated program executive office of the Naval Sea Systems Command, manages surface ship and submarine combat technologies and systems and coordinates Navy enterprise solutions across ship platforms.

Press Release, December 6, 2013; Image: Navy
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Hapag-Lloyd, CSAV Discuss Joint Opportunities

Another post on John’s Naval, Marine and other Service news

File Sofia Express is one of more than 140 ships in the Hapag-Lloyd fleet. Photo: Hapag-Lloyd
Thursday, December 05, 2013, 9:24 AM
Sofia Express is one of more than 140 ships in the Hapag-Lloyd fleet. Photo: Hapag-Lloyd
Hapag-Lloyd and CSAV are currently maintaining dialogue regarding the possibilities of mutual interest should the companies engage in a business partnership or any other form of association. To date, these discussions have not resulted in any binding or nonbinding agreement between the parties.

Hapag-Lloyd said more information will be published should any relevant development occur.

hapag-lloyd.com

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. Return of the Electric Boat

Another post on John’s Naval, Marine and other Service news

File f longer travel is in your plans, the Greenline 33 is the largest hybrid powerboat on the market today.
By Tyson Bottenus

Thursday, December 05, 2013, 9:51 AM
If longer travel is in your plans, the Greenline 33 is the largest hybrid powerboat on the market today.
In the 1880s it was possible to cruise your way around London by an electric ferry on the River Thames. At its height, the river carried 13 launches, each measuring 28 ft. long. They glided along at five knots and had a range of about 60 miles.
Each launch carried one ton of storage batteries hidden underneath the passenger seats. Charging stations were even placed along the river so these electric launches could continue up and down unhindered.
An article in Scientific American from 1883 praised the effortlessness they imbued: “the operation of an electric launch is the ideal of ease and simplicity. It consists, practically, of turning a switch and – letting her go.”
Designed initially by Gustave Trouve one year before, the first electric boats came complete with a headlamp and a horn.  But the electric boats on the River Thames were bigger. In addition, they were also quiet, more spacious and cleaner than their competition – the steam powered ferry.  “[Electric] launches are chiefly wanted in the summer when the heat and smoke, smell, oil, and dirt of a steam launch are objectionable,” one magazine reported. But as soon as they came to existence, they disappeared only a decade later – replaced by the advent of the internal combustion engine. Over a hundred years later, however, it seems electric boats are making their resurgence. This time will they stay?

The Return
Newport, Rhode Island is known for its grandiose sailboats and motoryachts, and the Newport Boat Show is a yearly landmark for enthusiasts asking the question, what’s next? The end-of-the-summer event brings dealers and customers from around the world together.
For most, it’s not their first time attending and the selection doesn’t change much year-to-year. On one side, you have sailboats – on the other, powerboats. But this year featured two companies who have never been to the Show before. And they were introducing something that few people had ever seen.
Enter the eCraft 20, a sleek open-transom day cruiser operated by a joystick that comfortably seats eight people.
“The whole design of the boat came from the fact that there’s no outboard motor and no inboard box,” said Rogan Van Gruisen of eCraft Yachts, “meaning we can create this wide open-transom design.” Van Gruisen, a native Newporter who studied yacht design in England, teamed up with esteemed naval architect Matt Smith to create the eCraft 20, an all-electric powerboat that can cruise at maximum speeds up to 8 kts. and easily go 30 nautical miles at its cruising speed of 5 kts.
“You’re not storing any fuel, you’re not spilling any fuel,” Rogan said. “The fact that you’re traveling silently is pretty amazing. And the cost benefits: it’s really cheap. We figured out that it’s about $1 of electricity to fully charge the battery. That’s the equivalent of what, $40 of gas if you’re motoring around all day?”
The eCraft 20 was designed for the weekend powerboater who wants a craft that can take him anywhere in the bay. But what if you wanted to extend your range just a little farther? Or perhaps go a bit faster? \We spoke with Constantine Constantinou of Greenline about the Greenline 33, which happened to be parked just a few feet away from the eCraft 20 that day.
“There’s a few electric boats out there,” Constantinou said. “But they’re smaller for the most part. We have the largest available electric/hybrid boat out there.”
The Greenline 33, of which over 300 have been manufactured so far, has a range of over 700 nautical miles with a cruising speed of seven knots. Because of its specially designed “superdisplacement” hull, it creates less wake. Combined with a solar paneled roof that can recharge the ship’s battery over the course of an entire day, the Greenline 33 offers a completely unique way to travel on the water.
Constantinou weighed in on the challenges electric and hybrid boats face. “The only problem I can think of that might be an issue is for the market to see these boats as functional and reliable. When Seaway [who owns Greenline] came up with this concept in 2009, it was right at the beginning of the economic crisis.”
“Everybody was gun-shy. They didn’t want to consider any new products. But Seaway thought that the product was so compelling. It was something new. They placed their faith in the product and since then the boats have received over 20 international awards for innovation and environmental friendliness. We have now over 400 boats that have been built in the last two and a half years. It’s a great success story.”
This success story that Constantinou talks about is one that’s been in the works for over 100 years now. When electric launches came on the scene in the 1880s, the promise this technology offered seemed poised to explode.
“Electrical power for river launches is now an established fact on the Thames and will probably be much improved in the coming years,” claimed Scientific American.
There was talk of adding more charging stations along the river to accommodate for the increased demand of electric boats. Three years after the first launches on the river Thames, one million visitors to the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair were transported via electric boat.
But it was the World’s Fair, surprisingly enough, that also spelled the fall of the electric boat. And, coincidentally, the rise of the internal combustion engine.

A Petroleum Boat

First and foremost, William Steinway was a piano craftsman.
But in the 1880s, he was also the financier who brought the petroleum-based internal combustion engine into the limelight when he met Gottlieb Daimler on a quest to Europe for ideas. Steinway purchased a trolley car powered by Daimler’s new engine and the manufacturing rights to any Daimler products in the United States for a whopping sum of $10,000.
Steinway, who initially planned to use the “horse-less trolley” to transport pianos, quickly saw the potential for the engine to be used in the marine environment. He had a Daimler internal combustion engine launch built and transported to the World’s Fair for the masses to see.
In October of 1893, just weeks before the end of the Fair, a dory capsized in the cold Lake Michigan waters. It’s described that three boats were sent out to the rescue: a lifeboat powered by sailors on the battleship Illinois, a naphtha-powered launch, and William Steinway’s one-of-a-kind internal combustion engine launch.
The vessel on the scene first was Steinway’s launch. Described as a “miracle for speed”, the boat travelled 15 kts. to the rescue. The first petroleum powered boat saved the capsized sailors and Chicago newspapers announced to the world that Gottlieb Daimler had created the first high-speed engine.
“Nothing can explode,” the newspapers reported later about the internal combustion system. After Steinway passed away, Daimler Motor Group was sold to General Electric and eventually became famous for the “Mercedez” engine. Daimler stayed with cars but the quest to create a better petroleum-based motorboat was on.
The electronic launch was out. Internal combustion was in. They simply traveled farther and faster.

The Future

More than 100 years later, it seems as if the tides may be turning for the electric boat.
In October 2013, the world saw the first ever electric/hybrid boat convention held in Nice, France. Aptly named “PlugBoat”, the conference drew in 70 delegates from over 14 countries in an effort to connect industry, R&D, and non-governmental organizations.
“It emerges that, although small in comparison to electric automobiles, battery-electric boats and hybrid-electric boats are making steady and very positive progress across Europe,” summarized Kevin Desmond, a representative for the PlugBoat conference. Torqueedo, who made headlines recently with the introduction of an 80 HP and 40 HP electric outboard motors, sponsored the weekend-long event.
“Given the significant output of the automobile manufacturers and the steady and unprecedented rise in electric car sales,” said Desmond, “the worldwide electric boat fleet will continue to grow to a point where there will eventually be more electric boats than [boats powered by internal combustion engines].”
In his talk addressed to the delegates, Desmond described the progress electric boats had made in the past 30 years and summarized his vision for the future, including the creation of a World Electric Boat Association.
Desmond echoed similar sentiments that Constantine Constantinou of Greenline had concerning the challenges electric and hybrid boats face. “The challenge will be to convince owners and operators that there is no need for range anxiety. We need to realize that electric boats are calming, even therapeutic, in a world where stress is a serious threat.”
Van Gruisen, when I spoke to him last, offered up that battery technology will be last frontier when it comes to electric boats.
“It’s the last piece of the puzzle. As battery technology increases, we’ll hopefully see electric boats going faster and farther.”
 

(As published in the November 2013 edition of Maritime Reporter & Engineering News –www.marinelink.com)
  • The all-electric eCraft20. With 12 hours of battery life, this boat is perfect for cocktail cruising, picnicking and fishing on a small bay.
    The all-electric eCraft20. With 12 hours of battery life, this boat is perfect for cocktail cruising, picnicking and fishing on a small bay.
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Today in U.S. Naval History: December 5

Another post on John’s Naval, Marine and other Service news

File USS Michigan (renamed USS Wolverine). (U.S. Navy Photo)
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MarineLink.com

Thursday, December 05, 2013, 11:10 AM
USS Michigan (renamed USS Wolverine). (U.S. Navy Photo)
Today in U.S. Naval History – December 5

1843 – Launching of USS Michigan at Erie, Penn., America’s first iron-hulled warship, as well as first prefabricated ship.

1941 – USS Lexington (CV-2) sails with Task Force 12 to ferry Marine aircraft to Midway, leaving no carriers at Pearl Harbor.

For more information about naval history, visit the Naval History and Heritage Command website at history.navy.mil.

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