North Korea to put US spy ship captured in 1968 on display in war museum as part of 60th anniversary ‘Victory Day’ celebration of the signing of treaty ending the Korean War

Another post on John’s Naval, Marine and other Service news

.
.

North Korea to put US spy ship captured in 1968 on display in war museum as part of 60th anniversary ‘Victory Day’ celebration of the signing of treaty ending the Korean War

  • The only US navy ship held by another country, is still listed as a commissioned Navy vessel
  • The siege killed one sailor and injured three, with the remaining 82 crew held hostage for 11 months in 1968
  • Crew claim they were fed turnips three meals a day and routinely beaten while in captivity
North Korea will put a captured U.S. Navy ship on display this week as part of a new war museum.
The USS Pueblo, the only US Navy ship held by a foreign government, will go on display as the crown jewel of a North Korean military museum on Victory Day, which commemorates the signing of the treaty that ended the Korean War 60 years ago.
Restored as part of the effort to renovate the museum, the Pueblo was captured in the late 60s of the eastern coast of North Korea. The Pueblo is held up in the North as proof the country stood up and drove out the U.S.
Its a museum: The USS Pueblo sits on the banks of a Pyongyang, North Korea river as North korean soldiers walk past it

Its a museum: The USS Pueblo sits on the banks of a Pyongyang, North Korea river as North korean soldiers walk past it
The museum, on the banks of a river in Pyongyang, the capital of North Korea, has been fully restored as part of the country’s celebration of the 60th anniversary of their victory by way of treaty.
Once captured, the crew were held hostage in the reclusive Communist country for 11 months. Having not been recovered or sunk, the ship is still listed as a commissioned Navy vessel.
‘I got shot up in the original capture, so we were taken by bus and then train for an all-night journey to Pyongyang in North Korea, and then they put us in a place we called the barn,’ Marine Corp sergeant Robert Cicca said. Saying that food was scarce, causing him to lose 60 pounds, Cicca added that the crew was forced to eat ‘fried turnips for breakfast, turnip soup for lunch, and fried turnips for dinner.’
Tourist destination: North Koreans now tour the ship in groups as part of a visit to a war museum

Tourist destination: North Koreans now tour the ship in groups as part of a visit to a war museum
Not a battleship: The USS Pueblo was barely armed, meant for intelligence gathering only

Not a battleship: The USS Pueblo was barely armed, meant for intelligence gathering only
International waters: At over 15 miles from the coast,the USS Pueblo was well beyond the 12 miles of territorial waters claimed by North Korea

International waters: At over 15 miles from the coast,the USS Pueblo was well beyond the 12 miles of territorial waters claimed by North Korea

Never built for combat, the USS Pueblo was launched in 1944 as a US Army cargo ship before being repurposed for intelligence gathering in 1967, before being sent to the Far East later that year, according to the Navy.
Purposely not heavily armed, the Pueblo was easily overtaken by North Korean forces in January, 1968, in an attack that killed one sailor and saw the remaining 82, including three seriously injured, captured. 
 
North Korean officials claimed shortly after the attack that the Pueblo was in North Korean territorial waters and posed a threat, a claim the U.S. denied. The Navy claimed the ship was over 15 miles from the coast of the nearest island – well beyond the 12 miles of territorial waters claimed by North Korea, in a subsequent film released by the US Navy.
By corroborating that evidence with location reporting from both the Pueblo and a sub hunter in the area, the Navy believes it has proof that the North Koreans misled American officials as to the location of the ship when it was overrun by forces from six boats covered by air support from MiG fighter jets.
In North Korean waters: North Korea asserts the USS Pueblo was in the country's territorial waters when captured, according to a propaganda video released by the Communist nation

In North Korean waters: North Korea asserts the USS Pueblo was in the country’s territorial waters when captured, according to a propaganda video released by the Communist nation
Dear leader
Dear leader
Dear leader: North Korean patriarch Kim il-Sung, referred to as ‘Dear Leader in the North,’ is seen in this propaganda video in which North Korea claimed ‘the US imperialists went down on their knees again’

The US was hesitant to commit to a battle over the ship with North Korea because it was in the middle of the Vietnam War to the south, and was wary about being spread too thin.
Despite being an intelligence gathering ship, according to the Navy, crew members have long asserted they had little information of value to share with North Korea, which resulted in brutal beating at the hands of North Korean soldiers.
‘The Koreans basically told us, they put stuff in front of us, they said you were here, you were spying, you will be shot as spies,’ Earl Phares said, adding that beatings were shared equally among the captive crew.
Put in front of cameras to confess, Pueblo crew members were courageously defiant during their forced confessions, even extending middle fingers in images seen outside the country. Once wise to the gesture, North Korean soldiers beat the soldiers even more for their boldness.
Held hostage: Crew members of the USS Pueblo hold up their hands while in captivity in North Korea in 1968

Held hostage: Crew members of the USS Pueblo hold up their hands while in captivity in North Korea in 1968
Forced confessions: Crew members of USS Pueblo pose while in captivity in North Korea in 1968

Forced confessions: Crew members of USS Pueblo pose while in captivity in North Korea in 1968
Long ago, but not forgotten: former USS Pueblo crew member Richard Rogala holds a painting of the USS Pueblo at his home in Sarasota, FL

Long ago, but not forgotten: former USS Pueblo crew member Richard Rogala holds a painting of the USS Pueblo at his home in Sarasota, FL
Founder: Kim il-Sung founded the North Korean state, leading it until his son Kim Jong-il took over after his death

Founder: Kim il-Sung founded the North Korean state, leading it until his son Kim Jong-il took over after his death
Only after a signed statement from Major General Gilbert Woodward, the chief US negotiator with North Korea, apologizing for ‘the grave acts’ committed against North Korea when the Pueblo ‘illegally intruded’ into the country’s territorial waters, were the hostages let go. Woodward read a statement into the record disavowing the confession both before and after the apology.
The hostages were released across the demilitarized zone between North and South Korea two days before Christmas, 11 months to the day after their capture.
Initially considered for a court marshall for losing his ship, Commander Lloyd Bucher never saw any charges brought against him after it was determined the crew had suffered enough.
Hostile takeover: Several speedboats filled with Korean soldiers had little trouble taking over the lightly armed USS Pueblo after spraying it with gunfire for about an hour

Hostile takeover: Several speedboats filled with Korean soldiers had little trouble taking over the lightly armed USS Pueblo after spraying it with gunfire for about an hour
For cargo: Known as the FP-344 prior to being commissioned the USS Pueblo for the Navy, the ship was used to transport US Army cargo in the waning days of World War II

For cargo: Known as the FP-344 prior to being commissioned the USS Pueblo for the Navy, the ship was used to transport US Army cargo in the waning days of World War II
Family business: Kim Jong-un, grandson of Kim il-Sung, took over North Korea in 2012 after the passing of his father Kim Jong-il

Family business: Kim Jong-un, grandson of Kim il-Sung, took over North Korea in 2012 after the passing of his father Kim Jong-il
Defending the ship’s captain, Phares said ‘It would have been nice to take out some of the guys, some of them, and maybe go down fighting, but it would have been total suicide.’
North Korea was said to have been close to returning the ship to the US in 2002, but reportedly back-peddled – an act that haunts the former crew even now.
‘It’s very disappointing to have it still there, and still being used as anti-American propaganda,’ Chicca said.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2378294/North-Korea-US-spy-ship-captured-1968-display-war-museum-60th-anniversary-Victory-Day-celebration-signing-treaty-ending-Korean-War.html#ixzz2a7Do9iVM
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

.
.

.

via Blogger http://www.h16613.com/2013/07/north-korea-to-put-us-spy-ship-captured.html

Sea monsters – the world’s biggest ships

Another post on John’s Naval, Marine and other Service news

.
.

Sea monsters – the world’s biggest ships

By Peter Huck

5:30 AM Friday Jul 26, 2013

As shipping companies chase profits, they’re building the biggest freighters the world has ever seen. Peter Huck reports

The driving factor in the size of container ships is the price of fuel. Photo / Getty Images

The driving factor in the size of container ships is the price of fuel. Photo / Getty Images
When the world’s biggest container ship was launched at South Korea’s Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering yard on June 14, a new era began in the competitive container trade. The MV Maersk Mc-Kinney Moller is the first of 20 “Triple-E” class container vessels ordered for the Asia-Europe route by Denmark’s A.P. Moller-Maersk Group.
Everything about this leviathan is oversized: 400m long – 70m more than the height of Auckland’s Sky Tower; reaching 14.5m below the waterline; able to carry containers stacked 20 high; with a total capacity of 18,270 20-foot containers (the Twenty-Foot Equivalent Unit, or TEU, the size of a 20-foot container, is the standard industry measurement).
The ship is more than four times the size of the largest container vessels that now visit New Zealand.
The Triple-E name describes three key attributes: energy efficiency, better environmental performance and economies of scale. It is a new industry benchmark designed to handle the roller coaster container industry.
“The whole background of this is that container shipping is very, very volatile price wise,” explains Janet Porter, editor-in-chief, containers, at Lloyd’s List and Containerisation International.
“We’ve just had a price war. It’s driven Asia-Europe freight rates down to about US$500 per 20-foot container. They were at US$1300 three months ago. Companies want to get their operating costs down. The bigger the ship, the bigger the economies of scale. That’s what they’re all banking on at the moment. To get bigger ships with much more fuel-efficient engines. Ships are also sailing far more slowly to save fuel. That means lower emissions. They want to be environmentally clean.”
With a top speed of 23 knots, the Mc-Kinney Moller is by no means the fastest container ship afloat. Instead, the vessel’s twin MAN diesel engines are designed to conserve energy, using about 35 per cent less fuel per container, according to Maersk, than the 13,000 TEU ships delivered to rivals. Exhaust gases are recycled to save energy.
“The driving factor is the price of fuel,” says John Konrad, editor-in-chief of Captain, a maritime website. The Triple-Es will be able to move a tonne of cargo 184km using one kilowatt-hour of energy. Maersk says that using the same amount of energy, a Boeing 747 can transport a tonne of cargo just 500m. By cutting fuel bills, Maersk is gambling that it can profit even in market downturns.
As well as the financial incentive, the Triple-Es will more than halve the amount of carbon dioxide emitted for each container moved, compared with the industry average on the Asia-Europe trade. Four more of the ships will go into service this year and the remaining 15 will be delivered next year and in 2015, and phased in as needed. CUTTING energy use is vital in an era of rising oil prices, and when the maritime industry’s use of heavy bunker fuels has prompted demands that the world’s commercial fleet reduce pollution, and cut CO2 emissions that help fuel climate change. The International Maritime Organisation has countered by pointing out that shipping emits only 2.7 per cent of greenhouse gases, making it the cleanest form of transport.
For Maersk, ordering the Triple-Es was a punt, based on how the company expected global trade to evolve. In April Maersk Group chief executive Nils Andersen said he expected “significant growth” on the Asia-Europe route. Maersk, which operates some 600 container ships, owned or chartered, must match vessels with routes, including New Zealand, as some grow and others shrink.
Until the global financial crisis, says Porter, the industry thrived on double-digit growth every year. In 2009, for the first time, cargo volumes plummeted, falling by 9 to 10 per cent. In 2010 they picked up again. By then manufacturers had run down stocks and needed to replenish inventory.
Shipping companies began ordering new ships. Meanwhile, trade remains uncertain, at least in the short term. But in the long run Maersk and other shippers think the Asia-Europe trade will grow.
The trick is to balance expected market demand with operating costs in an era of economic uncertainty, a global chess game that calls for strong nerves. Maersk’s Asia-Europe trade involves 12 ships calling at as many ports, sailing in a loop. The Triple-Es will replace the existing fleet, which will be deployed on different trades, triggering a “cascade” effect.
If history is any guide, the size of container ships will keep rising. The container shipping industry emerged 60 years ago after World War II, but the capacity of ships only climbed sharply in the past two decades, from around 6000 TEU, seen as ground-breaking then, to 8000-10,000 TEUs and, about five years ago, 12,000 to 14,000 TEUs, the industry norm.
When the banking crisis hit in 2008 trade faltered, explains Porter. The top end of the scale seemed stuck at 14,000 TEUs. But Maersk went out on a limb, initially ordering 10 Triple-Es at US$195 million each, with an option for ten more. When that option was exercised, the cost per vessel was US$185 million.
Rival shipping companies are close behind. Lloyd’s List reports that Switzerland’s Mediterranean Shipping Company (MSC) has been “linked” to an order for three 18,000-TEU ships from Daewoo. And the China Shipping Container Lines Company has ordered five ships of 18,400 TEU at about US$140 million per vessel.
While cheaper and larger than the Triple-Es, the price difference may reflect less sophisticated engines, meaning higher fuel costs and more carbon emissions. United Arab Shipping is also expected to order 18,400-TEU ships. And even 18,400 TEU may not be the limit. David Tozer, global manager for container ships at Lloyd’s Register Group, told the Guardian in March that 25,000-TEU ships are possible.
Unable to control fluctuating container-freight rates, shipping companies are also seeking to consolidate. Last month the big three – Maersk, the French line CMA CGM, and MSC, which control 40 per cent of the world’s container shipping capacity – announced a London-based alliance, the P3 Network, set to operate from next year. The trio will pool 255 ships in the Asia-Europe, Trans-Atlantic and Trans-Pacific trades. By deploying the best ships on specific trades, they hope to save on fuel and service more ports more often to out-compete rivals.
Larger ships, cleaner, energy-efficient engines and strategic alliances will have knock-on effects – 80 per cent of global trade is now shipped via container vessels, according to a UN report this year.
TAKE shipping lanes. Next year a widened Panama Canal is due to open, able to take ships of up to 14,000 TEU and allowing vessels in the China-US trade to visit US East Coast ports. Currently, the US is serviced by the West Coast ports of Oakland and Los Angeles-Long Beach.
Then there is the plan to build a second passage through the isthmus, which could also affect the size of container ships. China and Nicaragua last month announced the US$40 billion project, which would give China a 100-year concession to build a canal capable of taking vessels of up to 250,000 tonnes – more than twice the size limit for the US-dominated Panama Canal.
Significantly, the Triple-Es are too large to use even the upgraded Panama Canal, although they can navigate the Suez Canal. As well as accommodating huge bulk carriers and tankers, which carry raw materials and oil to China from Brazil and other Latin America nations, the proposed Nicaragua passage would open the way for a post-Triple-E generation of even more gigantic container vessels.
Vessels larger than the Triple-Es may also have difficulty negotiating the Malacca Strait, a key choke point on the Asia-Europe trade. The Malacca Max – the biggest theoretical vessel that could navigate the strait – is 20,000 TEUs.
Bigger ships would presumably have to travel from Pacific to Atlantic via China’s unbuilt canal, or maybe through the Southern Ocean.
Harbour facilities are also key to the rise of the Triple-Es. While 16 Asian and European ports are certified to handle the new ships, only 13 can now do so. Significantly, the US does not feature. Competitive ports need deep water, large, high-speed cranes, lots of storage space and ample transport links to quickly clear wharves.
In Europe, rivalry for the lucrative Asia trade is so intense that London is building a US$2.34 billion container port, Thames Gateway. Antwerp is enlarging its facilities for the Triple-Es.
There are no plans to use Triple-Es in the New Zealand trade. Richard Lough, senior international and coastal supply adviser at Maritime New Zealand says, “they’re too big. They’re too deep. There’s not a port in New Zealand that can take them. The biggest container ship we would probably be able to take – and it hasn’t arrived yet – is probably 5000 TEUs. They’ve generally been about 4200 TEUs.”
Tauranga, the fastest growing container port, is dredging its shipping channel to eventually handle 8000-TEU vessels and upgrading port facilities. But while this may give Tauranga an edge over Auckland, it is companies such as Maersk which ultimately call the shots. For instance, Maersk could opt to call only at one “super hub” in each main island. In May Maersk announced it was switching some of its ships from Tauranga back to Auckland, reversing a move made in 2011.
“The simple thing,” says Porter, “is that at some stage everyone is affected by the cascade effect.” In this respect the Triple-Es may conceivably influence the vexed issue of whether Auckland’s port should be sold to help finance the city’s new rail infrastructure projects.
And any super hub would probably need to upgrade, with better rail links and so on. Just as Maersk is trying to future-proof its position in the global maritime industry, so its decisions can lead to trading nations having to make expensive infrastructure decisions to future-proof their economies.

By Peter Huck

.
.

.

via Blogger http://www.h16613.com/2013/07/sea-monsters-worlds-biggest-ships.html

A400M Atlas Update

Another post on John’s Naval, Marine and other Service news

.
.

A400M Atlas Update

The A400 is getting closer to being in service and there have been some interesting bits of news these last couple of weeks.
At the Royal International Air Tattoo it has been doing its normal take of and sharp bank (is anyone else getting bored of this) routine and  also been seen doing a spot of formation flying with the Red Arrows, carrying out very short take off and landings (unloaded of course) and generally looking very sleek


You have to admit, it’s looking impressive
These are three presentations from Airbus that whilst a month or so old are still full of useful information
.
.

.

via Blogger http://www.h16613.com/2013/07/a400m-atlas-update.html

No frills on transtasman voyage

Another post on John’s Naval, Marine and other Service news

.
.

No frills on transtasman voyage

 0  2 ShareThis
Spirit of Queenstown ready for its voyage to Bluff by sea and to Kingston by road. Photo supplied.

Spirit of Queenstown ready for its voyage to Bluff by sea and to Kingston by road. Photo supplied.

Delivering a multimillion-dollar catamaran across the Tasman will be anything but a luxury journey for the four-man crew.

Those aboard the 26m Spirit of Queenstown, which is destined for Lake Wakatipu, will be ”sleeping on mattress squabs on the floor”, or more likely not sleeping at all, and dining on noodles during the three-day sea journey.
The Southern Discoveries’ purpose-built catamaran, which cost up to $5 million, will soon make the journey from Eden, New South Wales, to Bluff.
It will then be partially dismantled for the journey to Kingston by road. The whole trip is expected to take a week.
By year’s end, Spirit of Queenstown will be operating on Lake Wakatipu, carrying up to 150 passengers from Queenstown across the lake to Mt Nicholas Station.
Before leaving Australia, the catamaran will undergo 10 days of sea trials.
The departure date will depend on the weather.
Southern Discoveries general manager John Robson said two of the tourist company’s most experienced skippers, Queenstown-based Richard Moore and Milford-based Max Darroch, will help crew the catamaran across the Tasman.
They will familiarise themselves with the vessel before it leaves Australian waters. Mr Robson said maritime law required two crew to be awake and on the bridge at all times.
”The reality is that most of the time they’ll all be up. You get very, very little sleep on a trip like this, because you’re coming across the ocean and it’s not that easy to sleep lying on a mattress on a floor – so luxury it is not,” he said.
”She’s not an ocean liner, so she could be moving around a bit in the sea.”
Additional fuel for the journey will be carried in containers on the deck.
During the estimated three-day journey, the catamaran will travel at a speed of 15 knots.
Once it reaches Bluff, the catamaran will be hoisted out of the water, partially dismantled and transported by road to Kingston, where it will be launched.
It was hoped the catamaran would be operating on Lake Wakatipu towards the end of this year.
Southern Discoveries also operates four vessels in Milford Sound and cruises in Milford Sound and on Lake Wakatipu.
The company also owns and operates Harrisons Cove Kayaking, the Blue Duck Cafe and Bar in Milford, a Te Anau-based coach service, four information centres in Te Anau and Queenstown and owns half of jet-boat operator KJet.
.
.

.

via Blogger http://www.h16613.com/2013/07/no-frills-on-transtasman-voyage.html

Cruise ship kitchen nightmare: Luxury liner fails health inspection after staff send photos of unrefrigerated blue cheese and raw meat stored in crew cabins

Another post on John’s Naval, Marine and other Service news

.
.

Cruise ship kitchen nightmare: Luxury liner fails health inspection after staff send photos of unrefrigerated blue cheese and raw meat stored in crew cabins

  • Health officials conducted a surprise inspection of the Silversea ship Silver Shadow at Skagway, Alaska on June 17
  • Came after disgusted employees revealed they were forced to hide 15 trolleys worth of food in their cabins every night ‘in order to avoid inspection’ and took photos of raw meat sitting in a sink
  • The CDC released a damning report about the ship, but it does not have the authority to fine the company or stop it sailing
  • Passengers pay $5,000 a week and are told they will receive a ‘world class’ culinary experience
  • Silversea Cruises claims the abysmal inspection results are a ‘deeply disappointing’ anomaly
A cruise ship that charges passengers $5,000 a week for a ‘world class’ culinary experience has been caught storing meat unrefrigerated in crew cabin sinks and trolleys stacked high with blue cheese, milk and eggs in staff corridors.
Disgusted employees, fearing for their health and the health of passengers, anonymously alerted the Centers for Disease Control to the conditions aboard the Silversea Shadow by sending in photos of piled up food sitting for hours everywhere but the ship’s galley.
The tip prompted a surprise health inspection by the CDC’s Vessel Sanitation Program on June 17, when the ship was docked at Skagway, Alaska. 
Scroll down for video
Ship: The Silversea Shadow, pictured, has been caught storing meat unrefrigerated in crew cabin sinks and trolleys full of blue cheese, milk and eggs in staff corridors

Ship: The Silversea Shadow, pictured, has been caught storing meat unrefrigerated in crew cabin sinks and trolleys full of blue cheese, milk and eggs in staff corridors
Gross: Anonymous crew members took photos of raw meat that they were forced to store in crew cabin sinks at potentially hazardous temperatures

Gross: Anonymous crew members took photos of raw meat, pictured, that they were forced to store in crew cabin sinks at potentially hazardous temperatures
Horrified officials discovered there was an ‘organized effort to physically remove’ more than 15 trolleys stacked high with food and cooking equipment each night into some 10 crew cabins – each sleeping two or three people – to avoid inspections.
One staffer, working a 40-day contract as a pastry chef on the Silversea Cruises-owned vessel, claimed he was forced to sleep in a cabin with two other crew members and a trolley full of salami and unrefrigerated blue cheese to avoid health inspections. 
Adriano Colonna told CNN he was so repulsed, he refused to eat the food being served to passengers.
Silversea boasts in advertisements and on its website of serving up world class cuisine aboard its line of luxury cruise ships, that hold around 300 passengers.

Trolleys: Some 15 trolleys of food, including cheeses and deli meats, were stored each night in staff cabins to avoid inspections

Trolleys: Some 15 trolleys of food, including cheeses and deli meats, were stored each night in staff cabins to avoid inspections
But the VSP disagreed, giving the Shadow a damning score of 82 in the inspection when anything under an 84 is a fail.
In its scathing report, the officials said ‘dry foods, spices, canned foods, cooked foods, milk, raw meats, pasteurized eggs, cheeses of all types, baking goods, raw fruits, raw vegetables, and a variety of both hand held and counter model food equipment, pans, dishware and utensils’ were piled up and stored in some 10 crew cabins, each sleeping two to three workers.
It said foods such as cheeses, sliced and full pieces of deli meats and raw pork were all stored at potentially hazardous temperatures on the deck, and even on and under the beds of crew members.
Kitchen equipment including knives and a large meat slicers were found hidden under blankets in the cabins.
Equipment: Kitchen equipment including a large meat slicer and kitchen knives were discovered hidden under blankets and beds in crew cabins

Equipment: Kitchen equipment including a large meat slicer and kitchen knives were discovered hidden under blankets and beds in crew cabins
s

World class: The company boasts of offering a world class culinary experience, but at least two people aboard the ship became sick presumably from the food, pictured, aboard
The company told CNN that the liner was ‘deeply disappointed’ by the score and that the result of the inspection was an anomaly, as they’re used to getting grades in the high 90s. 
The spokesman refused to say who gave the command to hide food in cabins or whether anyone was fired.
On the VSP’s website, it inticates at least two cases of diarrhea among staff on the ship, no doubt caused by eating the hygienically kept food. 
But despite the abysmal score, all the VSP inspectors could do was pour chlorine liquid over the discarded food to prevent it from being used. They do not have the power to slap the liner with a fine or stop the ship sailing.
Silversea simply has to submit corrective action statements for deficiencies.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2377809/Silversea-Shadow-Luxury-cruise-fails-health-inspection-CDC-anonymous-staff-send-photos-gross-conditions–including-unrefrigerated-blue-cheese-raw-meat-stored-crew-cabins.html#ixzz2a6uIn5UL
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

.
.

.

via Blogger http://www.h16613.com/2013/07/cruise-ship-kitchen-nightmare-luxury.html

Video shows Coast Guard helicopter crew making dramatic rescue of a missing lobsterman 43 miles off Montauk

Another post on John’s Naval, Marine and other Service news

.
.

Video shows Coast Guard helicopter crew making dramatic rescue of a missing lobsterman 43 miles off Montauk 


A missing lobster fisherman has been found alive after an eight-hour search by the Coast Guard.
Jonathan Aldridge was found 43 miles south of Montauk on Wednesday morning after colleagues reported seeing him last on Tuesday night.
NBC New York reports that members of the Cape Cod helicopter crew that found Aldridge said that he was ‘just a flash of white floating in the water’.
SCROLL DOWN FOR VIDEO
Tough spot: The Coast Guard had difficulty spotting the man because he was bobbing in and out of view

Tough spot: The Coast Guard had difficulty spotting the man because he was bobbing in and out of view
Making the drop: They lowered a cage from the air that would help Jonathan Aldridge into the helicopter
Making the drop: They lowered a cage from the air that would help Jonathan Aldridge into the helicopter
Making the drop: They lowered a cage from the air that would help Jonathan Aldridge into the helicopter
Precious cargo: Aldridge is thought to have flown off the back of the lobster boat he was on at around 3.30am

Precious cargo: Aldridge is thought to have flown off the back of the lobster boat he was on at around 3.30am
Victory: He was eventually rescued about 12 hours later and had been using his boots as floatation devices

Victory: He was eventually rescued about 12 hours later and had been using his boots as floatation devices
Adding to the difficulty facing the coast guard crews, who responded from stations across New England, his body bobbed in and out of the water.
Though he went out searching for the crustaceans on board a 44-foot boat called the Anna Maria, he was found floating with no more than the t-shirt and shorts he was wearing.
Rather than a raft, he used his rubber boots as a floatation device which he told Newsday served as his lifesaver.
Aldridge has spoken to Newsday and said that he went into the water after being thrown ‘straight out of the back of the boat’ while moving a cooler on board at around 3.30am.
Out at sea: Aldridge was found 43 miles south of Montauk

Out at sea: Aldridge was found 43 miles south of Montauk
Recovered: He is now being treated for hypothermia and dehydration

Recovered: He is now being treated for hypothermia and dehydration
Relief: Aldridge's sister Cathy Patterson threw her hands up in excitement when she learned he was safe

Relief: Aldridge’s sister Cathy Patterson threw her hands up in excitement when she learned he was safe
The helicopter crew from Air Station Cape Cod MH60 found Aldridge at 3pm on Wednesday, putting his total time missing at around 12 hours.
Aldridge was part of a crew on the boat, though it does not appear that anyone else from his boat went overboard.
He is now being treated for dehydration and hypothermia, and there have been no updates on his condition.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2377762/Video-shows-Coast-Guard-helicopter-crew-making-dramatic-rescue-missing-lobsterman-43-miles-Montauk.html#ixzz2a6t5PYpd
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

.
.

.

via Blogger http://www.h16613.com/2013/07/video-shows-coast-guard-helicopter-crew.html

DCNS Refits French Navy’s Charles de Gaulle

Another post on John’s Naval, Marine and other Service news

.
.

DCNS Refits French Navy’s Charles de Gaulle

DCNS Refits French Navy's Charles de Gaulle
The French Navy’s Fleet Support Service (SSF) signed off on the completion of the intermediate refit of nuclear-powered aircraft carrier Charles de Gaulle after six months’ work by DCNS.
From hull to combat system, without forgetting compliance tests to the latest environmental standards, communications suite modernisation or the refurbishment of the accommodation and recreation areas, the project involved some 950 people and 1 million person-hours’ work.
In addition to scheduled maintenance, the refit was used to undertake significant modernisation. The work was performed in the Vauban drydock at the Toulon naval base. The ship was given a complete facelift that included the repainting of a total area of 26,000 square metres and the complete refurbishment of one of the main galleys. Other modernisation work included the replacement of the stabilisation computer. The propulsion system and other shipboard systems and equipment were inspected, overhauled and tested to ensure optimal performance in operation. Some 35 kilometres of cabling was also installed with a view to the later installation of a state-of-the-art IP network.
CVN Charles de Gaulle underwent a thorough overhaul performed by teams assembled by DCNS and its partners, supported day-to-day by the ship’s crew.

“Scheduled refits are essential to return a ship to ‘as new’ condition. This six-month period of intense contract maintenance and modernisation is over. Other teams will now resume shore-based day-to-day monitoring of the ship’s systems and equipment,” said Franck Bouffety, the Group’s Charles de Gaulle programme manager.

With over 1,000 tasks in progress each week, the Vauban drydock was very busy indeed. Despite the huge number of jobs to be performed, everything was completed on time. DCNS completed the 6,000 maintenance and modernisation ‘line tasks’ specified for this scheduled refit. In addition to the ship’s crew, all available staff based at the Toulon naval base were mobilised for the extended pit stop. Virtually every DCNS centre contributed in one way or another. In all, the Group assigned almost 500 employees to the project.
Technical data for intermediate refit

  •  Number of people involved: 950
  • area painted: 26,000 sq.m
  • cabling installed: 35 km

Engine room tasks:

  •  pipes cleaned and inspected: 25,000
  •  new pipes installed: 6,000

CVN Charles de Gaulle was commissioned on 18 May 2001 and it has 12 years of active service. The warship’s displacement when fully loaded amounts to 42,000 tonnes. It measures in overall length 261.50 m, its beam equals to 64.36 m, whereas in height the ship is an equivalent to a 20-storey building, reaching 75 m.

  • Average daily distance travelled: 1,000 km
  • Total distance travelled: 1 million km (≈ 23 circumnavigations)
  • Recent operations: Libya (operation Harmattan), Afghanistan.

Press Release, July 25, 2013; Image: DCNS
Follow Naval Today via:
Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Email
Linkedin

.
.

.

via Blogger http://www.h16613.com/2013/07/dcns-refits-french-navys-charles-de.html

North Korea unveiling its greatest Cold War prize: captured US Navy spy ship USS Pueblo

Another post on John’s Naval, Marine and other Service news

.
.

North Korea unveiling its greatest Cold War prize: captured US Navy spy ship USS Pueblo

(USN, File/ Associated Press ) – FILE – In this undated file photo from the U.S. Navy, U.S. Navy USS Pueblo sails underway at sea. The ship is North Korea’s greatest Cold War prize, a potent symbol of how the country has stood up to the great power of the United States, once in an all-out ground war and now with its push to develop the nuclear weapons and the sophisticated missiles it needs to threaten the U.S. mainland.

PYONGYANG, North Korea — If there was ever any doubt about what happened to the only U.S. Navy ship that is being held by a foreign government, North Korea has cleared it up. It’s in Pyongyang. And it looks like it’s here to stay.
With a fresh coat of paint and a new home along the Pothong River, the USS Pueblo, a spy ship seized off North Korea’s east coast in the late 1960s, is expected to be unveiled this week as the centerpiece of a renovated war museum to commemorate what North Korea calls “Victory Day,” the 60th anniversary this Saturday of the signing of the armistice that ended hostilities in the Korean War.
Video
The USS Pueblo crew campaigns to bring home their ship from North Korea after 45 years in captivity. Marking the 60th anniversary of the Korean War's end, the American warship will soon be on show at Pyongyang's renovated war museum.
The USS Pueblo crew campaigns to bring home their ship from North Korea after 45 years in captivity. Marking the 60th anniversary of the Korean War’s end, the American warship will soon be on show at Pyongyang’s renovated war museum.

China charges Bo Xilai with corruption, abuse of power

China charges Bo Xilai with corruption, abuse of power

The long-awaited trial of the disgraced kingpin is a test of party unity and President Xi’s leadership.

In Honduran prison talks, gangs offer reprieve, amid some doubts

In Honduran prison talks, gangs offer reprieve, amid some doubts

Church leaders try to stem violence in the country as U.S. law enforcement agencies watch for signs of progress.

Amid sea dispute, Philippines pushes back against China

Amid sea dispute, Philippines pushes back against China

The Philippines is trying to do what no other nation in the region is doing: thwart China’s claim to seas.

Train derails in Spain, killing at least 40

It was the country’s worst rail accident in decades.

Pope to address the faithful and the discontented at Copacabana

Pope to address the faithful and the discontented at Copacabana

Many young people are waiting to see what kind of message Francis will have for Brazil.
The ship is North Korea’s greatest Cold War prize. Its government hopes the Pueblo will serve as a potent symbol of how the country has stood up to the great power of the United States, once in an all-out ground war and now with its push to develop the nuclear weapons and sophisticated missiles it needs to threaten the U.S. mainland.
Many of the crew who served on the vessel, then spent 11 months in captivity in North Korea, want to bring the Pueblo home. Throughout its history, they argue, the Navy’s motto has been “don’t give up the ship.” The Pueblo, in fact, is still listed as a commissioned U.S. Navy vessel, the only one being held by a foreign nation.
But with relations generally fluctuating in a narrow band between bad to dangerously bad, the United States has made little effort to get it back. At times, outsiders weren’t even sure where North Korea was keeping the ship or what it planned to do with it.
Requests for interviews with the captain of one of the North Korean ships involved in the attack were denied, and officials here have been tight lipped about their plans before the formal unveiling.
The Pueblo incident is a painful reminder of miscalculation and confusion, as well as the unresolved hostilities that continue to keep the two countries in what seems to be a permanent state of distrust and preparation for another clash, despite the truce that ended the 1950-1953 war.
Already more than 40 years old and only lightly armed so it wouldn’t look conspicuous or threatening as it carried out its intelligence missions, the USS Pueblo was attacked and easily captured on Jan. 23, 1968.
Surrounded by a half dozen enemy ships with MiG fighter jets providing air cover, the crew was unable to put up much of a fight. It scrambled to destroy intelligence materials, but soon discovered it wasn’t well prepared for even that.
A shredder aboard the Pueblo quickly became jammed with the piles of papers anxious crew members shoved into it. They tried burning the documents in waste baskets, but smoke quickly filled the cabins. And there were not enough weighted bags to toss all the secret material overboard.
One U.S. sailor was killed when the ship was strafed by machine gun fire and boarded. The remaining 82, including three injured, were taken prisoner. The North Koreans sailed the Pueblo to the port of Wonsan.
For the survivors, that’s when the real ordeal began.
.
.

.

via Blogger http://www.h16613.com/2013/07/north-korea-unveiling-its-greatest-cold.html

Royal arrival no longer tots up for navy

Another post on John’s Naval, Marine and other Service news

.
.

belfasttelegraph
Thursday 25 July 2013
Icon Hi 21°C | Lo 13°C CHANGEBelfast

Royal arrival no longer tots up for navy

THE birth of a royal baby would, at one time, have sent a buzz of excitement throughout the Royal Navy, as the announcement would be followed by the time-honoured signal: “Splice the mainbrace.”

All sailors eligible to receive one daily tot of rum would now be entitled to have two.
For officers, it would be the only occasion when they too were allowed to have an official tot.
I was fortunate to enjoy ‘splicers’ for the arrival of Princes Andrew and Edward.
But since issuing rum ceased in 1970, it will be interesting to see how the senior service intends, if at all, to “splice the mainbrace”.
CDR ROGER PAINE RN
.
.

.

via Blogger http://www.h16613.com/2013/07/royal-arrival-no-longer-tots-up-for-navy.html

%d bloggers like this: