JC’s Navy Updates – New Zealand frigate on tour of East Asian ports

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New Zealand frigate on tour of East Asian ports

WELLINGTON, May 7 — A Royal New Zealand Navy frigate is visiting China and other ports in East Asia and the Pacific in support of “defense diplomacy” over the next month, the New Zealand Defense Force (NZDF) announced Tuesday.

The HMNZS Te Mana was visiting ports in Vietnam, China, the Republic of Korea, Japan and Guam as part of a long-standing program of defense diplomacy in the region, before returning home in June, said a statement from the NZDF.

The statement did not name the ports, except for Ho Chi Minh City in Vietnam.

The Te Mana had just successfully participated in Exercise Bersama Shield, a Five Power Defense Arrangements (FPDA) exercise that also involved forces from Australia, Malaysia, Singapore and the United Kingdom in waters of the South China Sea, Singapore and Malaysia.

In the waters around Guam, the Te Mana would take part in activities with the U.S. Navy and dock at the U.S. Navy facility there.

The ship’s docking there followed on from the announcement by the former U.S. Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta during his visit to New Zealand in September last year, authorizing New Zealand navy ships to visit U.S. Navy facilities subject to a case-by-case waiver.

New Zealand navy ships had previously been banned from U.S. military ports after the New Zealand government implemented a ban on visits by nuclear-armed and nuclear-powered ships in the early 1980s.

In 2011, the Te Mana had to abandon a port visit to Shanghai after breaking down during a tour of Asia.

The Five Power Defense Arrangements provide a framework for defense co-operation between the five nations and was established in 1971.

USS Reuben James Returns to Its Homeport

USS Reuben James Returns to Its Homeport

USS Reuben James Returns to Its Homeport

The Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Reuben James (FFG 57) returned to its homeport May 3 from a deployment to the western Pacific.

It is likely the ship’s final deployment prior to decommissioning this summer.

During the ship’s seven-month deployment, the crew of Reuben James participated in a series of bilateral maritime exercises or Cooperative Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) while conducting at-sea security scenarios, helicopter operations, a search and rescue practical, and surface gunfire drills in the Seventh Fleet area of responsibility.

“First and foremost, thank you to the crew of USS Reuben James for your outstanding performance,” said Reuben James Commanding Officer Cmdr. Daniel Valascho. “Our motto is ‘Back with a Vengeance,’ but now we’re back with a sense of satisfaction, knowing we did our part operating forward, strengthening partnerships and protecting freedom.”

Having completed its final deployment Reuben James will be decommissioned this August after 27 years of service to the fleet.

“I’m very proud of them all and I cannot think of a better crew to represent Reuben James on her final deployment,” said Command Master Chief CMDMC(SW) Johannes J. Gonzalez. “They maintained readiness, showed their pride and professionalism and always looked out for each other on and off duty.”

During the ship’s history it has completed deployments to the Arabian Gulf in support of Operations Enduring and Iraqi Freedom, to the Eastern Pacific in support of counter-drug operations, and it appeared in the 1990 motion picture The Hunt For Red October.

Hundreds of family members and friends were on hand and cheered as the ship came in sight at the Bravo Piers. The ship’s family readiness group made lei for each of the crew members and a giant blue-and-gold lei for the bow of the ship.

“I also want to thank all the families and friends who stood by us and prepared a native Hawaiian welcome for the entire crew. It was great to see you all pierside,” added Valascho.

The guided-missile frigates are multi-mission surface combatants, capable of Under-Sea Warfare (USW) and Surface Warfare (SW) missions. Reuben James is assigned to Commander, Destroyer Squadron 31 under Commander, Naval Surface Group Middle Pacific, in Hawaii.

Press Release, May 6, 2013; Image: US Navy

USS Reuben James Returns to Its Homeport

USS Reuben James Returns to Its Homeport

USS Reuben James Returns to Its Homeport

The Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Reuben James (FFG 57) returned to its homeport May 3 from a deployment to the western Pacific.

It is likely the ship’s final deployment prior to decommissioning this summer.

During the ship’s seven-month deployment, the crew of Reuben James participated in a series of bilateral maritime exercises or Cooperative Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) while conducting at-sea security scenarios, helicopter operations, a search and rescue practical, and surface gunfire drills in the Seventh Fleet area of responsibility.

“First and foremost, thank you to the crew of USS Reuben James for your outstanding performance,” said Reuben James Commanding Officer Cmdr. Daniel Valascho. “Our motto is ‘Back with a Vengeance,’ but now we’re back with a sense of satisfaction, knowing we did our part operating forward, strengthening partnerships and protecting freedom.”

Having completed its final deployment Reuben James will be decommissioned this August after 27 years of service to the fleet.

“I’m very proud of them all and I cannot think of a better crew to represent Reuben James on her final deployment,” said Command Master Chief CMDMC(SW) Johannes J. Gonzalez. “They maintained readiness, showed their pride and professionalism and always looked out for each other on and off duty.”

During the ship’s history it has completed deployments to the Arabian Gulf in support of Operations Enduring and Iraqi Freedom, to the Eastern Pacific in support of counter-drug operations, and it appeared in the 1990 motion picture The Hunt For Red October.

Hundreds of family members and friends were on hand and cheered as the ship came in sight at the Bravo Piers. The ship’s family readiness group made lei for each of the crew members and a giant blue-and-gold lei for the bow of the ship.

“I also want to thank all the families and friends who stood by us and prepared a native Hawaiian welcome for the entire crew. It was great to see you all pierside,” added Valascho.

The guided-missile frigates are multi-mission surface combatants, capable of Under-Sea Warfare (USW) and Surface Warfare (SW) missions. Reuben James is assigned to Commander, Destroyer Squadron 31 under Commander, Naval Surface Group Middle Pacific, in Hawaii.

Press Release, May 6, 2013; Image: US Navy

USA: NAVSTA Norfolk Takes Safety for Ride

USA: NAVSTA Norfolk Takes Safety for Ride

NAVSTA Norfolk Takes Safety for Ride

Naval Station (NAVSTA) Norfolk, with the support of the Norfolk Navy Exchange and the Sewells Point Safety Office, hosted the 3rd Annual Hampton Roads Military Motorcycle Safety Ride and Bike Show, May 3.

The 135-mile motorcycle ride provided an opportunity to ride with co-workers while promoting the safe operation of motorcycles in a group environment. The free event was open to all personnel with Department of Defense decals on their motorcycles and a current Motorcycle Safety Foundation Rider’s Safety Course card.

Guest Speaker, Rear Adm. Kenneth Norton, commander of Naval Safety Center, reminded participants to always take proper precautions before getting out on the road.

“Before you ride remember three E’s: equipment, environment, and ego,” he said. “Check that your motorcycle is operating up to standards, consider what environmental hazards you may endure such as heavy rain or crosswinds, and make sure to check your ego. Just because you are an experienced rider, does not mean you will not fall prey to the same mistakes as a rookie rider. These are lessons not only for today’s ride, but for every ride.”

Machinist Mate 1st Class David Kronberg, one of the event coordinators and participants, said events like these are critical to raise awareness of motorcycle safety especially with the impending warmer weather signifying the start of the riding season.

“Safety is critical for us as military members,” said Kronberg. “We strive to ensure our on-duty activities are safe and controlled through operational risk management and other safety mechanisms. However, when Sailors are off duty, they often act as if safety does not apply to them anymore. It is very important for them to remember that safety needs to be practiced around the clock, on and off duty.”

Prior to the ride, each participant conducted a pre-ride safety inspection of their motorcycle that included checking the frame, oil, lights, tires, and ensuring they had the required personal protective equipment (PPE). Required PPE for Navy motorcycle riders includes long-sleeve shirts, full-length pants, boots, full-finger gloves, shatter-proof eyewear, an approved helmet and a reflective vest.

Safety is one of the key areas of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative, which consolidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resiliency and hone the most combat-effective force in the history of the Navy and Marine Corps.

Kronberg said there is usually a correlation between warmer weather and an increase in motorcycle accidents, but commands can do their part to keep their Sailors informed and safe.

“If supervisors and Sailors stay proactive about ensuring their motorcycle riders attend required training, and work to promote traffic safety in general, we can all have a safer driving experience,” said Kronberg.

Kronberg continued by saying Navy safety officials have found lack of training to be one of the leading causes of accidents. Even Sailors with proper training may still be a risk because they fail to exercise good judgment and ride beyond their skill level in a moment of adrenaline rush.

In addition to good judgment, Kronberg said it is imperative for motorcyclists to be on the lookout for potential hazards

“Being aware of potential hazards on the road ahead of them can allow for extra time and room to avoid those hazards,” said Kronberg. “One of the biggest hazards to a motorcycle rider is the distracted drivers around them, such as people texting and talking on their phones.”

Sailors who took part in the event said they enjoyed the opportunity to ride with other shipmates.

“The ride gave us a chance to get together and have fun with other riders from the area,” said Culinary Specialist 2nd Class Daniel Brightman, an avid motorcycle rider assigned to the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). “We learned new skills and helped early riders by pointing potential problems they may have. It is important to me because I have the chance to police my shipmates and let them know if their bike is safe to ride.”

A bike show was held in the Navy Exchange parking lot following the conclusion of the ride. Food and motorcycle gear vendors were present and prizes were given for best sport bike, best cruiser, best custom job and people’s choice. USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) received a trophy for being the command with the most riders present.

Press Release, May 6, 2013; Image: Wikimedia

USA: NAVSTA Norfolk Takes Safety for Ride

USA: NAVSTA Norfolk Takes Safety for Ride

NAVSTA Norfolk Takes Safety for Ride

Naval Station (NAVSTA) Norfolk, with the support of the Norfolk Navy Exchange and the Sewells Point Safety Office, hosted the 3rd Annual Hampton Roads Military Motorcycle Safety Ride and Bike Show, May 3.

The 135-mile motorcycle ride provided an opportunity to ride with co-workers while promoting the safe operation of motorcycles in a group environment. The free event was open to all personnel with Department of Defense decals on their motorcycles and a current Motorcycle Safety Foundation Rider’s Safety Course card.

Guest Speaker, Rear Adm. Kenneth Norton, commander of Naval Safety Center, reminded participants to always take proper precautions before getting out on the road.

“Before you ride remember three E’s: equipment, environment, and ego,” he said. “Check that your motorcycle is operating up to standards, consider what environmental hazards you may endure such as heavy rain or crosswinds, and make sure to check your ego. Just because you are an experienced rider, does not mean you will not fall prey to the same mistakes as a rookie rider. These are lessons not only for today’s ride, but for every ride.”

Machinist Mate 1st Class David Kronberg, one of the event coordinators and participants, said events like these are critical to raise awareness of motorcycle safety especially with the impending warmer weather signifying the start of the riding season.

“Safety is critical for us as military members,” said Kronberg. “We strive to ensure our on-duty activities are safe and controlled through operational risk management and other safety mechanisms. However, when Sailors are off duty, they often act as if safety does not apply to them anymore. It is very important for them to remember that safety needs to be practiced around the clock, on and off duty.”

Prior to the ride, each participant conducted a pre-ride safety inspection of their motorcycle that included checking the frame, oil, lights, tires, and ensuring they had the required personal protective equipment (PPE). Required PPE for Navy motorcycle riders includes long-sleeve shirts, full-length pants, boots, full-finger gloves, shatter-proof eyewear, an approved helmet and a reflective vest.

Safety is one of the key areas of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative, which consolidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resiliency and hone the most combat-effective force in the history of the Navy and Marine Corps.

Kronberg said there is usually a correlation between warmer weather and an increase in motorcycle accidents, but commands can do their part to keep their Sailors informed and safe.

“If supervisors and Sailors stay proactive about ensuring their motorcycle riders attend required training, and work to promote traffic safety in general, we can all have a safer driving experience,” said Kronberg.

Kronberg continued by saying Navy safety officials have found lack of training to be one of the leading causes of accidents. Even Sailors with proper training may still be a risk because they fail to exercise good judgment and ride beyond their skill level in a moment of adrenaline rush.

In addition to good judgment, Kronberg said it is imperative for motorcyclists to be on the lookout for potential hazards

“Being aware of potential hazards on the road ahead of them can allow for extra time and room to avoid those hazards,” said Kronberg. “One of the biggest hazards to a motorcycle rider is the distracted drivers around them, such as people texting and talking on their phones.”

Sailors who took part in the event said they enjoyed the opportunity to ride with other shipmates.

“The ride gave us a chance to get together and have fun with other riders from the area,” said Culinary Specialist 2nd Class Daniel Brightman, an avid motorcycle rider assigned to the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). “We learned new skills and helped early riders by pointing potential problems they may have. It is important to me because I have the chance to police my shipmates and let them know if their bike is safe to ride.”

A bike show was held in the Navy Exchange parking lot following the conclusion of the ride. Food and motorcycle gear vendors were present and prizes were given for best sport bike, best cruiser, best custom job and people’s choice. USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) received a trophy for being the command with the most riders present.

Press Release, May 6, 2013; Image: Wikimedia

JC’s Navy Updates – Russian Navy to Recommission Three Submarines by 2014

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Russian Navy to Recommission Three Submarines by 2014

Russian Navy to Recommission Three Submarines in 2013

Three nuclear submarines of the Russian Navy currently under maintenance will be recommissioned by 2014, a Navy spokesman told journalists.

The K-410 Smolensk cruise missile submarine, which is undergoing repairs since 2011, will resume its service in the Northern Fleet, the spokesman said.

Tomsk cruise missile submarine, which was docked in 2010 due to problems with the cooling engine of its nuclear reactor; and the K-419 Kuzbass attack submarine, under repairs since 2010. The Kuzbass belongs to the same Akula II class as the ill-fated K-152Nerpa, on which 20 people were killed during sea trials in 2008 due to malfunction of the fire suppression system.

Source: Russian Navy, May 6, 2013; Image: Wikimedia

JC’s Navy Updates – BAE Systems Wins USS Laboon Contract

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BAE Systems Wins USS Laboon Contract

BAE Systems Bags USS Laboon Contract

BAE Systems Norfolk Ship Repair located on the Elizabeth River in Norfolk, Va. has received a $48.6 million contract for the USS Laboon fiscal 2013 extended drydocking selected restricted availability.

BAE Systems is going to be in charge of the planning and execution of depot-level maintenance, alteration, and modifications that will update and improve the ship’s military and technical capabilities.

USS Laboon is an Arleigh Burke-Class Destroyer of the U.S. Navy. The ship’s keel was laid down on 23rdMarch 1992, and she was launched on 20th February 1993. The ship was commissioned two years later, on 18th March 1995.

BAE Systems will perform the works in Norfolk, Va. and they are expected to be completed by December 2013.

NavalToday Staff, May 6, 2013; Image: Wikimedia

JC’s Navy Updates – U.S. missile destroyer calls on Russian port of Vladivostok

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U.S. missile destroyer calls on Russian port of Vladivostok

Souce:Xinhua Publish By  Updated 07/05/2013 5:39 pm in World / no comments

 

 

VLADIVOSTOK, May 7 — The U.S. guided missile destroyer Lassen arrived in Vladivostok Tuesday to take part in a WWII Victory Day parade.

The crew was welcomed by representatives of Russia’s Pacific Fleet command and U.S. consulate-general in Vladivostok.

The U.S. sailors will join Victory Day events on Thursday, which marks 68 years since Nazi Germany’s surrender to the Soviet Union.

The visit is also aimed at further strengthening of friendship and naval cooperation between the navies of Russia and the United States.

The crew of Lassen will also meet with Russian naval counterparts and Vladivostok city mayor, lay wreaths at the Eternal Flame of the PF Combat Glory memorial complex and make a sightseeing tour.

For their part, Lassen sailors will open the warship for Vladivostok residents and guests.

The 154-meter-long Lassen was commissioned in April 2001.

The American seamen will participate in the naval review on the Victory Day along with the crew of French frigate Vendemiaire, who arrived here Monday.