No Replacement for US Navy’s Toughest Warships as They Near Decommissioning

via John Currin (JC ‘s Naval and Military) – Google+ Public Posts

USS THETIS BAY

via John Currin (JC ‘s Naval and Military) – Google+ Public Posts

USS THETIS BAY
USS Thetis Bay (CVE-90/CVHA-1/LPH-6) was a Casablanca-class escort carrier of the United States Navy. Though not the last of the class to be built, she was the last Casablanca class hull to be scrapped.
Thetis Bay was laid down under Maritime Commission contract (MC hull 1127) on 22 December 1943 at Vancouver, Washington, by the Kaiser Shipbuilding Company; launched on 16 March 1944; sponsored by Mrs. Ricco Botta; and commissioned on 21 April 1944, Captain Donald E. Wilcox in command.
The Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships says Thetis Bay is "an inlet at the south end of Tebenkof Bay on the west coast of Kuiu Island in the Alexander Archipelago of Alaska."
http://ift.tt/2fRFm5K

USS THETIS BAY

via John Currin (JC ‘s Naval and Military) – Google+ Public Posts

USS THETIS BAY
USS Thetis Bay (CVE-90/CVHA-1/LPH-6) was a Casablanca-class escort carrier of the United States Navy. Though not the last of the class to be built, she was the last Casablanca class hull to be scrapped.
Thetis Bay was laid down under Maritime Commission contract (MC hull 1127) on 22 December 1943 at Vancouver, Washington, by the Kaiser Shipbuilding Company; launched on 16 March 1944; sponsored by Mrs. Ricco Botta; and commissioned on 21 April 1944, Captain Donald E. Wilcox in command.
The Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships says Thetis Bay is "an inlet at the south end of Tebenkof Bay on the west coast of Kuiu Island in the Alexander Archipelago of Alaska."
http://ift.tt/2fRFm5K

USS THETIS BAY

via John Currin (JC ‘s Naval and Military) – Google+ Public Posts

USS THETIS BAY
USS Thetis Bay (CVE-90/CVHA-1/LPH-6) was a Casablanca-class escort carrier of the United States Navy. Though not the last of the class to be built, she was the last Casablanca class hull to be scrapped.
Thetis Bay was laid down under Maritime Commission contract (MC hull 1127) on 22 December 1943 at Vancouver, Washington, by the Kaiser Shipbuilding Company; launched on 16 March 1944; sponsored by Mrs. Ricco Botta; and commissioned on 21 April 1944, Captain Donald E. Wilcox in command.
The Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships says Thetis Bay is "an inlet at the south end of Tebenkof Bay on the west coast of Kuiu Island in the Alexander Archipelago of Alaska."
http://ift.tt/2fRFm5K

USS Texas

via John Currin (JC ‘s Naval and Military) – Google+ Public Posts

USS Texas
USS Texas (BB-35), the second ship of the United States Navy named in honor of the US state of Texas, is a New York-class battleship. The ship was launched on 18 May 1912 and commissioned on 12 March 1914.[7][8]
Soon after her commissioning, Texas saw action in Mexican waters following the "Tampico Incident" and made numerous sorties into the North Sea during World War I. When the United States formally entered World War II in 1941, Texas escorted war convoys across the Atlantic, and later shelled Axis-held beaches for the North African campaign and the Normandy Landings before being transferred to the Pacific Theater late in 1944 to provide naval gunfire support during the Battles of Iwo Jima and Okinawa. Texas was decommissioned in 1948, having earned a total of five battle stars for service in World War II, and is now a museum ship near Houston, Texas.
Among the world's remaining battleships, Texas is notable for being the only remaining World War I-era dreadnought battleship, though she is not the oldest surviving battleship: Mikasa, a predreadnought battleship ordered in 1898 by the Empire of Japan, and HMS Victory, launched in 1765 (Nelson's flagship at the Battle of Trafalgar), are both older than Texas. She is also noteworthy for being one of only six remaining ships and the only remaining capital ship to have served in both World Wars.[9][A 1]
Among US-built battleships, Texas is notable for her sizeable number of firsts: the first US Navy vessel to house a permanently assigned contingent of US Marines, the first US battleship to mount anti-aircraft guns, the first US ship to control gunfire with directors and range-keepers (analog forerunners of today's computers), the first US battleship to launch an aircraft,[10] from a platform on Turret 2,[11] one of the first to receive the CXAM-1 version of CXAM production radar in the US Navy,[A 2] the first US battleship to become a permanent museum ship,[A 3][10] and the first battleship declared to be a US National Historic Landmark.

USS HARRY S TRUMAN – Straits of Gibraltar 2004.

via John Currin (JC ‘s Naval and Military) – Google+ Public Posts

USS HARRY S TRUMAN – Straits of Gibraltar 2004.
USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) is the eighth Nimitz-class aircraft carrier of the United States Navy, named after the 33rd President of the United States, Harry S. Truman. The ship's callsign is Lone Warrior, and she is currently homeported at Naval Station Norfolk, Virginia.
Harry S. Truman was launched on 7 September 1996 by Newport News Shipbuilding, Newport News, Virginia,[2] and commissioned on 25 July 1998 with Captain Thomas Otterbein in command. President Bill Clinton was the keynote speaker, and other notable attendees and speakers included Missouri Representative Ike Skelton, Missouri Governor Mel Carnahan, Secretary of Defense William Cohen and Secretary of the Navy John H. Dalton.
Harry S. Truman was initially the flagship of Carrier Group Two and, beginning 1 October 2004, of Carrier Strike Group Ten.
Beginning in 2001, the Harry S. Truman Carrier Battle Group participated in Operation Joint Endeavor, Operation Deny Flight, Operation Southern Watch, Operation Enduring Freedom – Afghanistan, Operation Iraqi Freedom, Summer Pulse '04, and NATO Operation Medshark/Majestic Eagle '04.
http://ift.tt/2aIo6eU

151214-N-NU281-369 SUEZ CANAL (Dec. 14, 2015) Aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75)…

via John Currin (JC ‘s Naval and Military) – Google+ Public Posts

151214-N-NU281-369 SUEZ CANAL (Dec. 14, 2015) Aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) approaches the Friendship Bridge while transiting the Suez Canal. Harry S. Truman Strike Group is deployed in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operation. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class J. R. Pacheco/Released)

HARLAND & WOLFF Shipyard – c1909

via John Currin (JC ‘s Naval and Military) – Google+ Public Posts

HARLAND & WOLFF Shipyard – c1909
Harland & Wolff was formed in 1861 by Edward James Harland (1831–95) and Hamburg-born Gustav Wilhelm Wolff (1834–1913, in the UK from age 14). In 1858 Harland, then general manager, bought the small shipyard on Queen's Island from his employer Robert Hickson.

Harland & Wolff's Belfast drawing offices early in the 20th century
After buying Hickson's shipyard, Harland made his assistant Wolff a partner in the company. Wolff was the nephew of Gustav Schwabe, Hamburg, who was heavily invested in the Bibby Line, and the first three ships that the newly incorporated shipyard built were for that line. Harland made a success of the business through several innovations, notably replacing the wooden upper decks with iron ones which increased the strength of the ships; and giving the hulls a flatter bottom and squarer cross section, which increased their capacity.
When Harland died in 1895, William James Pirrie became the chairman of the company until his death in 1924. Thomas Andrews also became the general manager and head of the draughting department in 1907. It was in this period that the company built Olympic and her sister ships Titanic and Britannic between 1909 and 1914, commissioning Sir William Arrol & Co. to construct a massive twin gantry and slipway structure for the project.
In 1912, due primarily to increasing political instability in Ireland, the company acquired another shipyard at Govan in Glasgow, Scotland. It bought the former London & Glasgow Engineering & Iron Shipbuilding Co's Middleton and Govan New shipyards in Govan and Mackie & Thomson's Govan Old yard, which had been owned by William Beardmore and Company. The three neighbouring yards were amalgamated and redeveloped to provide a total of seven building berths, a fitting-out basin and extensive workshops. Harland & Wolff specialised in building tankers and cargo ships at Govan. The nearby shipyard of A. & J. Inglis was also purchased by Harland & Wolff in 1919, along with a stake in the company's primary steel supplier, David Colville & Sons. Harland & Wolff also established shipyards at Bootle in Liverpool, North Woolwich in London and Southampton. These shipyards were all eventually closed from the early 1960s however, when the company opted to consolidate its operations in Belfast.
http://ift.tt/1S3uOr5

HMAT 9A20 Geelong HOBART1914

via John Currin (JC ‘s Naval and Military) – Google+ Public Posts

HMAT 9A20 Geelong HOBART1914
Geelong was a ship which owned by the Blue Anchor Line, and, after 1910, by P&O. She was constructed in 1904 by Barclay, Curle and Co. Ltd., at Glasgow, Scotland.[1][2] When originally constructed, she had accommodation for 120 saloon and 200 third-class passengers, and also carried cargo. Her gross register tonnage was 7700 (or 7,951[3]) tons, and she was 450 feet (137 meters) long, powered by triple-expansion steam engines, and capable of 14 knots,[4] with an average cruise speed of 12 knots.[3][5]
In August 1909, Geelong participated in a search for her sister ship Waratah , which had disappeared without trace close to the South African coast, and was thought to be disabled and drifting.[6]
During World War I, the Government of Australia leased Geelong for use as a troopship to transport the Australian Imperial Force to the Middle East and Europe.[7] Designated HMAT A2 Geelong, the ship departed on her first voyage as a troopship on 22 September 1914, carrying 440 soldiers from Melbourne, Australia, consisting of the Australian Army′s 3rd Field Artillery Brigade, the 3rd Field Company Engineers, and some members of the 12th Infantry Battalion. She proceeded to Hobart, Australia, where she picked up another 912 soldiers, consisting of the 12th Infantry Battalion and the 3rd Light Horse Regiment. She left Hobart, bound for Egypt, on 20 October 1914.
Her second outbound trooping voyage left Adelaide, Australia, on 31 May 1915, transporting 1,264 soldiers of the 27th Infantry Battalion and the 7th Field Ambulance unit. She also picked up another 252 soldiers, who were reinforcements for various other units, from Fremantle, Australia, on 7 June 1915.
Her final departure from Australia was on 18 November 1915, carrying 1,362 soldiers, including the 32nd Infantry Battalion and some reinforcements for other units. Shortly after disembarking the men in Egypt,[8] Geelong sank after a collision with SS Bonvilston, an Admiralty store ship, in the Mediterranean Sea near Alexandria, Egypt, on 1 January 1916. There was no loss of life.
http://ift.tt/2q0w3FN