IJN Furutaka (古鷹 重巡洋艦 Furutaka jūjun’yōkan?) was the lead ship in the two-vessel Furutaka-class of heavy…

via Public RSS-Feed of John Currin. Created with the PIXELMECHANICS ‘GPlusRSS-Webtool’ at http://gplusrss.com http://ift.tt/1oQtJJ0
IJN Furutaka (古鷹 重巡洋艦 Furutaka jūjun'yōkan?) was the lead ship in the two-vessel Furutaka-class of heavy cruisers in the Imperial Japanese Navy. It was named after Mount Furutaka, located on Etajima, Hiroshima immediately behind the Imperial Japanese Navy Academy.
http://ift.tt/1oQtMVc

Amagiri (天霧 “Heavenly Mist”?) [1] was the 15th of 24 Fubuki-class destroyers, built for the Imperial…

via Public RSS-Feed of John Currin. Created with the PIXELMECHANICS ‘GPlusRSS-Webtool’ at http://gplusrss.com http://ift.tt/1s6TQLS
Amagiri (天霧 "Heavenly Mist"?) [1] was the 15th of 24 Fubuki-class destroyers, built for the Imperial Japanese Navy following World War I. When introduced into service, these ships were the most powerful destroyers in the world.[2] They served as first-line destroyers through the 1930s, and remained formidable weapons systems well into the Pacific War. She is most famous for ramming the PT-109 commanded by Lieutenant John F. Kennedy, better known as a U.S. President.

USS Iowa (BB-61) was the lead ship of her class of battleship and the fourth in the United States Navy…

via Public RSS-Feed of John Currin. Created with the PIXELMECHANICS ‘GPlusRSS-Webtool’ at http://gplusrss.com http://ift.tt/1txLtvQ
USS Iowa (BB-61) was the lead ship of her class of battleship and the fourth in the United States Navy to be named in honor of the 29th state. Owing to the cancellation of the Montana-class battleships, Iowa is the last lead ship of any class of United States battleships and was the only ship of her class to have served in the Atlantic Ocean during World War II.
During World War II, she carried President Franklin D. Roosevelt across the Atlantic to Mers El Kébir, Algeria, en route to a crucial 1943 meeting in Tehran with British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and Soviet leader Josef Stalin. She has a bathtub—an amenity installed for Roosevelt, along with an elevator to shuttle him between decks.[1] When transferred to the Pacific Fleet in 1944, Iowa shelled beachheads at Kwajalein and Eniwetok in advance of Allied amphibious landings and screened aircraft carriers operating in the Marshall Islands. She also served as the Third Fleet flagship, flying Adm. William F. Halsey's flag at the Japanese surrender in Tokyo Bay. During the Korean War, Iowa was involved in raids on the North Korean coast, after which she was decommissioned into the United States Navy reserve fleets, better known as the "mothball fleet." She was reactivated in 1984 as part of the 600-ship Navy plan and operated in both the Atlantic and Pacific Fleets to counter the recently expanded Soviet Navy. In April 1989, an explosion of undetermined origin wrecked her No. 2 gun turret, killing 47 sailors.
Iowa was decommissioned for the last time in 1990, and was initially stricken from the Naval Vessel Register in 1995. She was reinstated from 1999 to 2006 to comply with federal laws that required retention and maintenance of two Iowa-class battleships. In 2011 Iowa was donated to the Los Angeles–based non-profit Pacific Battleship Center and was permanently moved to Berth 87 at the Port of Los Angeles in the summer of 2012, where she was opened to the public as the USS Iowa Museum.
http://ift.tt/1jMMtG5

SS Indiana (BB-58), a South Dakota-class battleship, was the fourth ship of the United States Navy named…

via Public RSS-Feed of John Currin. Created with the PIXELMECHANICS ‘GPlusRSS-Webtool’ at http://gplusrss.com http://ift.tt/1pIsSGA
SS Indiana (BB-58), a South Dakota-class battleship, was the fourth ship of the United States Navy named in honor of the 19th state. Her keel was laid down on 20 November 1939 by the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company of Newport News, Virginia. She was launched on 21 November 1941 sponsored by Mrs. Lewis C. Robbins, daughter of Indiana governor Henry F. Schricker, and commissioned on 30 April 1942, Captain Aaron Stanton Merrill in command.
http://ift.tt/1jyKcOY

USS Indiana (Battleship No. 1) was the lead ship of her class and the first battleship in the United…

via Public RSS-Feed of John Currin. Created with the PIXELMECHANICS ‘GPlusRSS-Webtool’ at http://gplusrss.com http://ift.tt/1pIsS9R
USS Indiana (Battleship No. 1) was the lead ship of her class and the first battleship in the United States Navy comparable to foreign battleships of the time.[6] Authorized in 1890 and commissioned five years later, she was a small battleship, though with heavy armor and ordnance. The ship also pioneered the use of an intermediate battery. She was designed for coastal defense and as a result her decks were not safe from high waves on the open ocean.
Indiana served in the Spanish–American War (1898) as part of the North Atlantic Squadron. She took part in both the blockade of Santiago de Cuba and the battle of Santiago de Cuba, which occurred when the Spanish fleet attempted to break through the blockade. Although unable to join the chase of the escaping Spanish cruisers, she was partly responsible for the destruction of the Spanish destroyers Plutón and Furor. After the war she quickly became obsolete—despite several modernizations—and spent most of her time in commission as a training ship or in the reserve fleet, with her last commission during World War I as a training ship for gun crews. She was decommissioned for the third and final time in January 1919 and was shortly after reclassified Coast Battleship Number 1 so that the name Indiana could be reused. She was sunk in shallow water as a target in aerial bombing tests in 1920 and her hulk was sold for scrap in 1924.
http://ift.tt/SRK5oD

USS Indiana (BB-58), a South Dakota-class battleship, was the fourth ship of the United States Navy …

via Public RSS-Feed of John Currin. Created with the PIXELMECHANICS ‘GPlusRSS-Webtool’ at http://gplusrss.com http://ift.tt/1txLmjQ
USS Indiana (BB-58), a South Dakota-class battleship, was the fourth ship of the United States Navy named in honor of the 19th state. Her keel was laid down on 20 November 1939 by the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company of Newport News, Virginia. She was launched on 21 November 1941 sponsored by Mrs. Lewis C. Robbins, daughter of Indiana governor Henry F. Schricker, and commissioned on 30 April 1942, Captain Aaron Stanton Merrill in command.
http://ift.tt/1jyKcOY

Jun’yō (隼鷹 jun’yō?, meaning “peregrine falcon”) was a Hiyō-class aircraft carrier of the Imperial Japanese…

via Public RSS-Feed of John Currin. Created with the PIXELMECHANICS ‘GPlusRSS-Webtool’ at http://gplusrss.com http://ift.tt/1pIsOGY
Jun'yō (隼鷹 jun'yō?, meaning "peregrine falcon") was a Hiyō-class aircraft carrier of the Imperial Japanese Navy. She was laid down at Nagasaki as the passenger liner Kashiwara Maru, but was purchased by the Japanese Navy in 1941 and converted to an aircraft carrier. Completed in May 1942, the ship participated in the Aleutian Islands Campaign the following month and in several battles during the Guadalcanal Campaign in late 1942. Her aircraft were disembarked several times and used from land bases in a number of battles in the South West Pacific. Jun'yō was torpedoed in November 1943 and spent three months under repair. She was damaged by several bombs during the Battle of the Philippine Sea in mid-1944, but was quickly repaired. Lacking aircraft, she was used as a transport in late 1944 and was torpedoed in December. Jun'yō was under repair until March 1945 when the repairs were deemed uneconomical. She was then effectively hulked for the rest of the war. The ship was deemed not worth the cost to repair by the Americans after the surrender of Japan in September and she was broken up in 1946–47.