US Navy halts deliveries of Freedom-class littoral combat ship

   1 day ago

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Navy has halted deliveries of Lockheed Martin’s Freedom-class littoral combat ship, citing a design flaw with the ship’s transmission.

In a statement to Defense News, the Navy pointed to “a material defect” with the ship’s combining gear, a complex transmission that transmits power generated by the ship’s engines to its waterjet propulsion system, and said it is working to design a fix for in-service littoral combat ships while holding off on taking delivery on new ships.

The Freedom LCS was designed by Lockheed Martin and built by Fincantieri’s Marinette Marine shipyard. The combining gear with the defect was designed by the German firm RENK AG. The Navy, Lockheed and RENK AG have worked together on a fix, which will likely take months to install for each ship, according to a senior Navy official who spoke on condition of anonymity.

The acknowledgement of the design flaw — early failure of the ship’s high-speed clutch bearings — confirms the Navy’s suspicions first reported by Defense News in December. Navy officials have expressed confidence, however, that the service is on a good path to fixing the defect and getting the ships to a useful place.

In a statement, the Navy said it is working to ease the burden on commanders and enable them to still make use of the ship, even as the Navy works through the process of testing the proposed fix.

“A design fix has been developed and is in production, to be followed by factory and sea-based testing,” a Navy statement read. “The Navy is determining the plan to install this fix on ships in the Fleet.

“The fix will be installed and tested on new construction ships prior to the Navy taking deliveries of those ships. Measures have been implemented to mitigate risk to the in-service Freedom variant ships while the Navy moves swiftly to correct the deficiency and minimize operational impacts.”

The modified combining gear will be tested at the RENK AG factory and on a new ship at sea before it is accepted, said Rear Adm. Casey Moton, the head of the unmanned and small combatants office at Naval Sea Systems Command.

“The planned redesign of the defective bearings will be rigorously tested both on land at the manufacturing facility and at sea on a new construction ship before it is accepted and installed in-service,” Moton said in a statement.

The Navy told Lockheed Martin it believes the combining gear issue was a “latent defect,” meaning the service expects the company will be responsible for the repairs, according to a senior Navy official. Lockheed has not yet responded to the the Navy and no agreement has yet been reached over how those repairs will be paid for.

But just how much those repairs will cost is not yet know, said Capt. Danny Hernandez, spokesman for the assistant secretary of the Navy for research, development and acquisition.

“The cost of the repair will be determine once a government-approved solution has been identified,” Hernandez said.

Lockheed Martin said in a statement that it is committed to fixing the combining gear issue.

“In partnership with the U.S. Navy, Lockheed Martin is aggressively pursuing a resolution to the gear issue the Freedom-variant Littoral Combat Ship is currently experiencing,” the statement read.

The Navy has put out a class advisory on the Freedom variant, which restricts some operations of the ship. But a source familiar with the issue told Defense News that as designed, it can operate up to 34 knots even with restrictions in place in various configurations. The advisory restricts certain configurations that put stress on the failing clutch bearings, two sources confirmed to Defense News.

The Freedom-class LCS has been bedeviled by issues with its combining gear, which is arguably an imperfect solution engineered to meet the 40-knot-plus speed requirement.

The string of combining gear casualties dates back to at least late 2015, when the LCS Milwaukee broke down on its maiden voyage to its home port in Mayport, Florida, and had to be towed into the Little Creek base in Hampton Roads, Virginia. Early the next year, the LCS Fort Worth suffered a casualty to the combining gear in port when sailors accidentally ran the system without lube oil running through it.

The early issues, however, are likely not the same as the clutch bearing failures that prompted the Navy to halt deliveries, however.

Early in 2020, LCS-9 (USS Little Rock) suffered a breakdown of its combining gear, which was followed in October by the casualty to LCS-7 (USS Detroit). Detroit was forced to hobble back to port from a deployment to Latin America, but a power failure en route, forcing the Navy to have it towed to port.

from JC’s Naval, Maritime and Military News https://ift.tt/3p7rCDU
via IFTTT

Taiwan military stages drill aimed at repelling China attack Updated 10:41 pm EST, Monday, January 18, 2021

HSINCHU, Taiwan (AP) — Taiwanese troops using tanks, mortars and small arms staged a drill Tuesday aimed at repelling an attack from China, which has increased its threats to reclaim the island and its own displays of military might.

“No matter what is happening around the Taiwan Strait, our determination to guard our homeland will never change,” said Maj. Gen. Chen Chong-ji said, director of the department of political warfare, about the exercise at Hukou Army Base south of the capital Taipei.

Chen said the exercise was intended as a show of Taiwan’s determination to maintain peace between the sides through a show of force.

The drills are also meant to reassure the public the military is maintaining its guard ahead of next month’s Lunar New Year festival, when many troops take leave.

Hukou base lies in Hsinchu county, a center for Taiwan’s high-tech industries that have thrived despite the constant threats of invasion by China, which considers the self-governing island democracy part of its own territory to be conquered by force if necessary.

Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen has sought to bolster the island’s defenses with the purchase of billions of dollars in weapons from key ally the U.S., including upgraded F-16 fighter jets, armed drones, rocket systems and Harpoon missiles capable of hitting both ships and land targets. She has also boosted support for the island’s indigenous arms industry, including launching a program to build new submarines to counter China’s ever-growing naval capabilities.

China’s increased threats come as economic and political enticements bear little fruit, leading it to stage war games and dispatch fighter jets and reconnaissance planes on an almost daily basis toward the island of 24 million people, which lies 160 kilometers (100 miles) off China’s southeast coast across the Taiwan Strait.

Along with world’s largest standing military, numbering around 2 million members, China has the largest navy, with approximately 350 vessels, including two aircraft carriers and about 56 submarines. It also possesses around 2,000 combat fighters and bombers and 1,250 ground-launched ballistic missiles, considered a key strategic and psychological weapon against Taiwan.

Taiwan’s armed forces are a fraction of that number, with much of its ground force consisting of short-term conscripts, and its fleet numbers only around 86 vessels, roughly half of them missile boats for coastal patrol.

from JC’s Naval, Maritime and Military News https://ift.tt/3ix4xIj
via IFTTT

A sad end for HMS Active, which survived Falklands War battles, only to be used as target practice and sunk in Pakistan navy drill HMS Active is a Type 21 frigate which was transferred to Pakistan in 1994 and renamed the PNS Shah Jahan The frigate was sunk during a Pakistan navy live-fire drill in the North Arabian Sea Type-21 Class frigate was built in Southampton, launched in 1972 and survived the Falklands War

 By SOPHIE TANNO FOR MAILONLINE

HMS Active, a Royal Navy frigate which survived active duty in the Falklands War, has met its end during a Pakistan navy drill. 

The Type 21 frigate – decommissioned by the Royal Navy in 1994 and sold to Pakistan which renamed her the PNS Shah Jahan – was blown up in a training exercise on January 12.

Video released by the Pakistan Navy showed the ship being struck by a torpedo in the North Arabian Sea before splitting in half and disappearing beneath the waves.

Read More

‘So sad,’ one Twitter user wrote. ‘Served on her from 89-91 and saw her in Bahrain in 2013. Great memories of my time onboard.’ 

HMS Active is a Type 21 frigate which was transferred to Pakistan in 1994 and renamed the PNS Shah Jahan. It was sunk during a live-fire Navy drill

HMS Active is a Type 21 frigate which was transferred to Pakistan in 1994 and renamed the PNS Shah Jahan. It was sunk during a live-fire Navy drill 

HMS Active, a Royal Navy Type 21 frigate which was transferred to Pakistan in 1994 and recommissioned as the PNS Shah Jahan, was sunk on January 12 as part of a live-fire exercise

HMS Active, a Royal Navy Type 21 frigate which was transferred to Pakistan in 1994 and recommissioned as the PNS Shah Jahan, was sunk on January 12 as part of a live-fire exercise

HMS Active was commissioned in July 1977 and went on to participate in the Falklands War, departing on May 10, 1982. File image of HMS Active above

HMS Active was commissioned in July 1977 and went on to participate in the Falklands War, departing on May 10, 1982. File image of HMS Active above 

The navy drill on January 12 saw the Pakistan Navy Fleet firing live weapons, with the frigate among the targets that were destroyed with anti-ship missiles and torpedoes. 

Video of the military exercise shows a missile being launched by the Pakistani Navy fleet which flies across the North Arabian Sea. 

It hits the frigate which subsequently breaks in half from the impact. 

In a statement, the Pakistan Navy said: ‘In an impressive fire power display, #PakNavy demonstrated combat readiness & War Fighting capabilities through Live Weapon Firing at North Arabian Sea. 

‘Missiles & Torpedoes launched from #PakNavy Submarines successfully engaged intended targets.’

The Navy Lookout tweeted: ‘Pakistani Navy has destroyed PNS Shah Jahan during SINKEX in the Arabian sea. 

In a statement, the Pakistan Navy said: 'In an impressive fire power display, #PakNavy demonstrated combat readiness & War Fighting capabilities through Live Weapon Firing at North Arabian Sea'

In a statement, the Pakistan Navy said: ‘In an impressive fire power display, #PakNavy demonstrated combat readiness & War Fighting capabilities through Live Weapon Firing at North Arabian Sea’

The ship was expended as a target by the Pakistan Navy in the North Arabian Sea earlier this month as part of a live-fire drill

The ship was expended as a target by the Pakistan Navy in the North Arabian Sea earlier this month as part of a live-fire drill

HMS Active, a frigate which survived the Falklands War, has met its end during a Pakistan navy drill

HMS Active, a frigate which survived the Falklands War, has met its end during a Pakistan navy drill

‘Type 21 frigate, ex-HMS Active transferred to Pakistan 1994.’

HMS Active was commissioned in July 1977 and went on to participate in the Falklands War, departing on May 10, 1982.  

Following its service in the Falklands War, Active was decommission in September 1994. 

It was sold to Pakistan the same month and renamed the Shah Jahan. 

The Royal Navy’s HMS Active  

HMS Active served as a general purpose frigate in the Royal Navy. 

The Type-21 Class frigate was built in Southampton, launched in 1972 and commissioned in July 1977. 

Active participated in the Falklands War with Argentina, forming part of the main British fleet. The frigate set out from HMNB Devonport on May 10, 1982. 

The ship was used to escort supply convoys and carry out shore bombardment missions at night.

HMS Active served as a general purpose frigate in the Royal Navy

HMS Active served as a general purpose frigate in the Royal Navy

On the night of June 13, 1982, HMS Active shelled on Argentine positions during the Battle of Mount Tumbledown. 

By the mid-1980s, in common with the other surviving Type 21s, HMS Active suffered from hull cracking. 

Following its service in the Falklands War, Active was decommissioned in September 1994 . It was sold to Pakistan the same month and renamed the Shah Jahan.

From 1998–2008, the ship underwent extensive modernisation at the Naval Base Karachi and was reclassified as guided missile destroyer. 

Her wartime performance included in deployments in patrolling off the Gulf of Aden, Gulf of Oman, Persian Gulf, and Arabian Sea.  

PNS Shah Jahan was sunk as a target by the Pakistan Navy on January 12.  

from JC’s Naval, Maritime and Military News https://ift.tt/3o6DV1M
via IFTTT

HMS Triumph arriving Sydney on one of her rare visits HMS Triumph was a Royal Navy Colossus-class light fleet aircraft carrier. She served in the Korean War and later, after reconstruction, as a support ship.

 

HMS Triumph arriving Sydney on one of her rare visits

HMS Triumph was a Royal Navy Colossus-class light fleet aircraft carrier. She served in the Korean War and later, after reconstruction, as a support ship.

https://ift.tt/29MSo1z

from JC’s Naval, Maritime and Military News https://ift.tt/35VGbmi
via IFTTT

US Navy Destroyer and USMC Aircraft to Join Royal Navy CSG on Maiden Deployment

US Navy Destroyer and USMC Aircraft to Join Royal Navy CSG on Maiden Deployment

File Royal navy picture of the UK CSG.

US Navy Destroyer And USMC Aircraft To Join Royal Navy CSG On Maiden Deployment

In a joint statement, the United States Department of Defense and United Kingdom Ministry of Defence have confirmed that that US Navy and Marine Corps personnel will join the UK’s Carrier Strike Group on its maiden deployment later this year.

The Joint Declaration supports UK Carrier Strike Group, led by the UK’s aircraft carrier, HMS Queen Elizabeth, on its inaugural deployment this year. The Carrier Strike Group will be complemented by US Marine Corps and US Navy personnel and equipment, including a detachment of US Marine Corps F-35B Lightning II aircraft and the US Navy’s destroyer, USS The Sullivans (DDG-68).

This joint declaration paves the way for the US Navy and Marine Corps to be joining the HMS QUEEN ELIZABETH Carrier Strike Group this year for the inaugural Carrier Strike 21 deployment. I am delighted that the UK now possesses a 21st century Carrier Strike capability, which has been greatly assisted by the unswerving support and cooperation of the United States at all levels over the past decade. This deployment embodies the strength of our bilateral ties and reflects the depth and breadth of this vital defence and security partnership.



UK Defence Secretary Ben Wallace

USS The Sullivans (DDG-68) is a Flight I Arleigh Burke-class ship displacing over 8,000 tons and fitted with 90 Mk41 VLS cells. The ship is home ported in Mayport, Florida.

VMFA-211 lands onboard HMS Queen Elizabeth

The Carrier Strike Group (CSG) has reached Initial Operating Capability (IOC) in December 2020. An operational deployment later this year will see the Royal Navy HMS Queen Elizabeth Carrier Strike Group sail in the Mediterranean Sea, the Persian Gulf and end up in the Pacific (in waters near Japan). The ship will carry 24 F-35B jets, including US Marine Corps aircraft, in addition to a number of helicopters. 

from JC’s Naval, Maritime and Military News https://ift.tt/3bVTlUa
via IFTTT

%d bloggers like this: